Good Thinking

New California housing community has its own urban farm

The Cannery has a 10 mi (16 km) network of bike trails, as well as a network of walking paths for people to get around
The Cannery has a 10 mi (16 km) network of bike trails, as well as a network of walking paths for people to get around
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The Cannery has a 10 mi (16 km) network of bike trails, as well as a network of walking paths for people to get around
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The Cannery has a 10 mi (16 km) network of bike trails, as well as a network of walking paths for people to get around
The Cannery is surrounded and fed by a 7.4-ac (3-ha) working farm
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The Cannery is surrounded and fed by a 7.4-ac (3-ha) working farm
The Cannery is inspired by the agricultural roots and environmental innovation of Davis
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The Cannery is inspired by the agricultural roots and environmental innovation of Davis
The Cannery is split into four neighborhoods, each with different types of housing
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The Cannery is split into four neighborhoods, each with different types of housing
The Cannery is aimed at contributing to a healthy way of life for its residents
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The Cannery is aimed at contributing to a healthy way of life for its residents
Each home in the Cannery features a 1.5-kW solar system for energy generation and can be upgraded for net zero living
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Each home in the Cannery features a 1.5-kW solar system for energy generation and can be upgraded for net zero living
Developer the New Home Company says the Cannery will serve as a model of an agrihood and of sustainable urban farming
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Developer the New Home Company says the Cannery will serve as a model of an agrihood and of sustainable urban farming

A new farm-to-table community, said to be the first in California, has opened in the city of Davis. The Cannery is made up of more than 500 energy-efficient homes, open spaces and trails surrounded and fed by a 7.4-ac (3-ha) working farm.

We've covered similar agrihoods (towns with agriculture integrated into them for contributing to food demand) previously at Gizmag, although often as concepts for the future, like the Homefarm by Spark Architects. Agrihoods do exist as more recognizably traditional towns though. Agritopia in Arizona, Harvest in Texas, Serenbe in Georgia and Willowsford in Virginia are just four examples across the US, and the Cannery is similar to these.

Developed by the The New Home Company, the Cannery is said to be inspired by the agricultural roots and environmental innovation of Davis, and is aimed at contributing to a healthy way of life for its residents. There are four neighborhoods hosting 547 homes altogether, with each home no more than 300 ft (91 m) from a park or open space.

The most high-end of the neighborhoods is called Sage, and comprises 73 park homes ranging from 1,943 to 3,702 sq ft (181 to 344 sq m). The homes each feature up to six bedrooms, five bathrooms and garages with space for up to three cars. They cost up to US$1 million and over.

The Cannery is inspired by the agricultural roots and environmental innovation of Davis
The Cannery is inspired by the agricultural roots and environmental innovation of Davis

Of the other neighborhoods, Tilton and Persimmon comprise cottages and bungalows respectively, with their homes priced from the low $700,000s. Heirloom, meanwhile is comprised of townhomes priced from the mid $400,000s. Each home in the Cannery features a 1.5-kW solar system for energy generation and can be upgraded for net zero living.

The Cannery also boasts a 10-mi (16-km) network of bike trails, as well as a network of walking paths for people to get around. A plaza provides space for outdoor get-togethers, access to retail outlets and covered bicycle parking with places to use and charge electronic devices. There will also be an agri-classroom for those wishing to learn about agriculture.

In addition to being a home to residents, the New Home Company says the Cannery will serve as a model of an agrihood and of sustainable urban farming.

The Cannery opened and launched home sales in August. More than 5,000 people were estimated to have visited on its opening weekend.

The video below provides an introduction to the Cannery.

Source: The Cannery

Cannery

5 comments
socalboomer
Neat idea - too bad it's aimed at only a few, and the ones who, really, will only benefit from it by having it as a bragging point. The poor and middle class, those who could really benefit from a healthy lifestyle, have no way to get in there. It's pretty typical of the whole area, though. Being able to boast of driving a Prius and living in an ecological commune is important to them. Me? I'll still be living in my urban home, commuting to work in my reasonably priced car.
Stephen N Russell
Need this all over Central Valley from Bakersfield north to Fresno alone. maybe augment vinters as mini vinters? Go Organic. Host produce markets. Then expand north into OR & WA, ID
the.other.will
Davis has strict limits on development. It's a global biotech center. Million dollar homes are not unusual there. The Cannery is a good fit for what existing residents want. The poor & middle class have a relatively limited amount of housing within city limits. Surrounding communities are more affordable, but, of course, require commutes to jobs within Davis.
Don Duncan
RMI (Rocky Mountain Institute) consulted on a passive solar house in Davis (about a decade ago) that required no energy for heating or cooling. Davis has been a leader in this field.
ljaques
Love the concept, but I'm disgusted by the result. One green idea, given to a designer Yuppie, who names it "The Cannery"? That's a fish town name, boys and girls, not an ag name. California is a desert state. I know, having lived there for 36 years. Why is the plant density 3 per square foot? Talk about busy, water-hungry sidewalk areas. Nothing about any of the architecture or landscaping of these million dollar homes says anything whatsoever to me about ag or farming. People with that much money don't want to get their hands dirty, anyway. (sigh) 1.5kW of solar is a pittance, but at least they'll be using that much less of the massively expensive electrical legacy GrayOut Davis left them. I didn't see a single garden or farm in any of the pics, nor did I read anything about them in the text, so I'm guessing there are none. WhatEVER. This whole thing reeks of a poorly planned marketing scheme, not a together community. D - redo your homework, Fuppies.