Architecture

Supertall ceramic skyscraper under construction in Dubai

Supertall ceramic skyscraper u...
The Wasl Tower is located on a prominent site near the Burj Khalifa and will rise to a total height of 302 m (990 ft)
The Wasl Tower is located on a prominent site near the Burj Khalifa and will rise to a total height of 302 m (990 ft)
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The Wasl Tower is located on a prominent site near the Burj Khalifa and will rise to a total height of 302 m (990 ft)
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The Wasl Tower is located on a prominent site near the Burj Khalifa and will rise to a total height of 302 m (990 ft)
The Wasl Tower's ceramic fins are designed to both shade the building and let some daylight into the interior
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The Wasl Tower's ceramic fins are designed to both shade the building and let some daylight into the interior
The Wasl Tower has an attractive, gently twisting form
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The Wasl Tower has an attractive, gently twisting form
Construction on the Wasl Tower is expected to be completed in 2020
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Construction on the Wasl Tower is expected to be completed in 2020
Render depicting one of the Wasl Tower's plush apartments
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Render depicting one of the Wasl Tower's plush apartments
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UN Studio, working with engineer and architect Werner Sobek, has begun construction on an interesting new supertall skyscraper in Dubai. Named Wasl Tower, the mixed-use building stands out from the many skyscrapers in that part of the world with its ceramic facade, unusual form, and integrated solar-powered lighting system.

The Wasl Tower is being built on a prominent site near the Burj Khalifa and will reach a total height of 302 m (990 ft). It sports an attractive design inspired by the contrapposto pose and will gently twist as it rises, with a seam of vertically-stacked balconies running its length, and swimming pools on its rooftop terrace.

The skyscraper's intricate ceramic facade will shade the building's interior with fins while reflecting some daylight inside. The facade's solar-powered lighting system sounds pretty high-tech, too.

"Facade lighting housed behind the fins and developed with Arup Lighting, is programmed as a rhythmic animation that breathes with the cadence of this 24-hour metropole and provides a visual connection to the city," says UN Studio. "This facade lighting is powered [by] the energy cube PV panels located on the car park building."

UN Studio says that once it's completed, Wasl Tower will be the world's tallest ceramic facade, though KPF recently completed the far taller Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre in China, which is clad in glazed terracotta.

Construction on the Wasl Tower is expected to be completed in 2020
Construction on the Wasl Tower is expected to be completed in 2020

Inside, the building will measure 106,534 sq m (1,146,722 sq ft) of floorspace, split between offices, guest rooms, public areas and apartments. Mandarin Oriental will operate a luxury hotel with over 250 rooms. A total of 17 elevators will allow people to get around.

The project will also include an adjacent low-rise car-park building that hosts the solar panels for powering the lighting system as well as a ballroom on the first floor. The roof of the car park will boast a large outdoor pool deck and be connected to the skyscraper by a pedestrian bridge.

Construction on the Wasl Tower is expected to be completed sometime in 2020.

Source: UN Studio

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5 comments
vince
Innovation is not America's middle name anymore. Name a tall tower over 1774 feet that's made in America? Name one that is fully off the grid with it's own power? America is a backward's country now thanks to Republicans.
MattII
@vince, why bother building something that isn't actually needed?
Douglas Bennett Rogers
America's forte is shutting down large technical projects. R. H. Sailors was shut down in Kansas City some years ago. Would have been world's tallest building.
Oren.E
@Mattll, your argument represents the thought process of the poor. Throuought history and cultures they won't send their 14 years old son back to school but rather to work and to support the family. That's harsh life when you only do what is necessary right now instead of being able to invest in your kids, in their education, in their future.
Oren.E
What's the point of the ceramics here? Do they serve some engineering function?