Urban Transport

Stilride e-scooter is made from robotically folded stainless steel

Stilride e-scooter is made fro...
A rendering of the planned commercial version of the Stilride SUS1
A rendering of the planned commercial version of the Stilride SUS1
View 6 Images
A close look at the Stilride SUS1's bodywork
1/6
A close look at the Stilride SUS1's bodywork
A rendering of the planned commercial version of the Stilride SUS1
2/6
A rendering of the planned commercial version of the Stilride SUS1
Plans call for the Stilride SUS1's body to ultimately be folded from a single sheet of stainless steel
3/6
Plans call for the Stilride SUS1's body to ultimately be folded from a single sheet of stainless steel
The first Stilride SUS1 prototype was recently completed – note the relatively large wheels and the beefy front and rear suspension
4/6
The first Stilride SUS1 prototype was recently completed – note the relatively large wheels and the beefy front and rear suspension
Another look at the Stilride SUS1's folded steel frame
5/6
Another look at the Stilride SUS1's folded steel frame
Stilride founders Tue Beijer (left) and Jonas Nyvang
6/6
Stilride founders Tue Beijer (left) and Jonas Nyvang
View gallery - 6 images

Road-legal electric scooters typically consist of a tubular metal frame, covered with plastic body panels. Swedish startup Stilride is taking what it claims is a more eco-friendly approach with a scooter made from folded sheets of stainless steel.

Named the SUS1, the vehicle started out as a government-funded research project, and is now being designed in partnership with Swedish product development company Semcon.

In the current prototype, the body is made of sections of both 0.5- and 1.5-mm stainless steel sheeting. Before being welded together, these are folded and curved into the desired shapes utilizing Stilride's proprietary LIGHT.FOLD robotic production system.

Company co-founder Jonas Nyvang tells us that in the final version, the aim is to have the entire body made from a single sheet that gets folded origami-style.

The first Stilride SUS1 prototype was recently completed – note the relatively large wheels and the beefy front and rear suspension
The first Stilride SUS1 prototype was recently completed – note the relatively large wheels and the beefy front and rear suspension

According to Nyvang and co-founder Tue Beijer, this building method not only results in a distinctive look, but it also requires considerably less material and manual labor than the manufacturing of traditional tube-and-panel scooters. It can additionally be carried out in small, regional factories, cutting down on the transportation of raw materials and finished products. And finally, both the steel scraps and the scooter bodies themselves are fully recyclable.

Nyvang says that a production model should be available in 2022/2023, priced at around US$5,500. Specs have yet to be announced, but he promises us that "it will be outstanding both in range and speed."

Potential buyers can register for updates via the link below.

Source: Stilride

View gallery - 6 images
4 comments
Martin Hone
Pretty much how the original Vespa and Lambretta scooters were made. Probably for the same reasons....
nick101
Stainless steel is tough to work with, why not regular steel dip-galvanized?
bkwanab
But where do you store your helmet while shopping and where does the shopping go when you've got it?

The original Vespa's and Lambretta's used stamped steel frames and bodywork, as did the Ariel Leader and Arrow motorcycles. And we should not forget the Rumi Formichino scooter that could embarrass many motorcycles with it's performance and cast aluminum body/chassis.
ReservoirPup
@nick101 - there are so many stainless steels around and I speak about the standard ones only.