Military

US Marine Corps receives first Amphibious Combat Vehicle I.I prototype

US Marine Corps receives first...
BAE Systems was awarded a US Marine Corps contract for the Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development phase of the Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 program
BAE Systems was awarded a US Marine Corps contract for the Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development phase of the Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 program
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BAE Systems rolled out the first of 16 Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) 1.1 prototypes to the US Marine Corps in a ceremony at the company’s York, Pennsylvania facility
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BAE Systems rolled out the first of 16 Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) 1.1 prototypes to the US Marine Corps in a ceremony at the company’s York, Pennsylvania facility
Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) 2014 swim test
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Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) 2014 swim test
BAE Systems was awarded a US Marine Corps contract for the Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development phase of the Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 program
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BAE Systems was awarded a US Marine Corps contract for the Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development phase of the Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 program
The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) operates on land as well as at sea
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The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) operates on land as well as at sea
The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) at rest
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The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) at rest
The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) at sea
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The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) at sea
The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) is based on an existing platform
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The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) is based on an existing platform
BAE Systems’ ACV 1.1 solution has completed thousands of miles of mobility testing and a full range of amphibious operations, including demonstrations of launch and recovery
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BAE Systems’ ACV 1.1 solution has completed thousands of miles of mobility testing and a full range of amphibious operations, including demonstrations of launch and recovery
The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) hitting the surf
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The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) hitting the surf

At its York, Pennsylvania facility, BAE Systems has unveiled the first of 16 Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) 1.1 prototypes it is developing for the US Marine Corps. The fully amphibious, ship-launchable and ship-recoverable 8x8 wheeled armored troop carrier is being developed under a US$103.7 million contract for the Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development phase of the ACV 1.1 program.

To save on costs, the ACV 1.1 is built upon an existing platform from Iveco Defence Vehicles and BAE describes it as "highly effective at sea when compared to any other amphibious vehicle in production today." Weighing in at 67,500 lb (30,617 kg), it can carry a payload of 7,280 lb (3,302 kg) and 13 passengers in a suspended interior seat structure. In addition, it has space for a crew of three in blast-protected positions.

Along with the energy-absorbing seats, the ACV 1.1 has a blast-resistant hull for better protection against mines, IEDs, kinetic energy rounds, and overhead blasts. There's also an automatic fire suppression system on board.

The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) hitting the surf
The Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) hitting the surf

Under the bonnet, the ACV 1.1 has a 700-hp engine powering all eight wheels used both on land and in the surf zone. For all its weight, the ACV 1.1 can do over 65 mph (105 km/h) on paved roads and at sea can manage 6 kts (7 mph, 11 km/h). In terms of range, it can cover up to 325 mi (523 km) at 55 mph (89 km/h) on land, or for land and sea missions can travel 12 nm (13 mi, 22 km) at sea, then travel over 250 mi (402 km) once on dry land.

The ACV 1.1 may not have the smallest turning radius at 36 ft (11 m) curb to curb, but it can handle a 60 percent gradient as well as battering through a Sea State 3 and a 9 ft (2.7 m) plunging surf.

BAE says the 16 prototypes will be tested by the Marine Corps starting Q1 next year.

BAE Systems rolled out the first of 16 Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) 1.1 prototypes to the US Marine Corps in a ceremony at the company’s York, Pennsylvania facility
BAE Systems rolled out the first of 16 Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) 1.1 prototypes to the US Marine Corps in a ceremony at the company’s York, Pennsylvania facility

"BAE Systems has a long-standing legacy of supporting the Marine Corps' amphibious mission," says John Swift, the company's director for the ACV 1.1 program. "That expertise, coupled with the hard work of our dedicated ACV team, has allowed us to deliver the first of these vehicles ahead of schedule."

The video below introduces the ACV 1.1.

Source: BAE Systems

9 comments
keith14
It can only take 13 soldiers at a time. Not much good for unloading thousands of troops from ship to shore. If the second world war taught us anything on D day at Normandy. As soon as the troops are deployed they got cut to ribbons by the Nazis. What makes this overpriced monster any different from the old landing craft. The wheels won't be of any use if tank traps were in place. Would see them hung up and useless. Also the payload cut to ribbons like before.
Grunchy
I wonder how they would take Normandy from the Nazis today? Probably using a different method.
Jon Smith
I want one for my bugout bag!
Timelord
Normandy was seven decades ago. The world has changed. I strongly doubt we'll ever be in the position of storming beaches with thousands of soldiers. In the 21st century, hard targets would probably be softened up with a few cruise missiles, smart bombs or other precision munitions to reduce opposition. It's more about fighting smarter nowadays than raw numbers.
Derek Howe
I agree with Timelord. In my eyes, all this is is a program to keep defense contractors pockets full. I'm all for a big great military, but not for wasteful spending...which IMO is what this is. I'm sure it's better then the one it's replacing...but wars have changed. It's like someone coming out with a better carriage for horses that deliver a smoother ride and breaks down less.....well...great, but I'll still choose a car.
Stephen N Russell
Needs larger aft space for say 50 troops & 2 turrets with cannon or MG to return fire from bunkers on beachside, flame thrower,, mortar too.s
ljaques
One of these things would be just the ticket to follow a pirate to their beach, release the boys with all their toys, and take 'em out. Keep a couple of these off Somalia for good cheer.
Island Architect
Nice design... bottom blast resistant. It's really a 4 x 4! And if it is hydraulically bogied... it's got a smooth ride. Bravo!
myale
Hmm wondering why it has a crew in todays world of autonomy - get rid of the crew - and use autonomous driving enabling a redesign of the protective systems to protect a computer and the drive systems rather than a redundant 'crew'