Architecture

"Vertical Forest" planned for Switzerland

"Vertical Forest" planned for ...
The mixed-use project will comprise 36 floors of luxury apartments, office spaces, and a 5,000 sq m (53,819 sq ft) retail center
The mixed-use project will comprise 36 floors of luxury apartments, office spaces, and a 5,000 sq m (53,819 sq ft) retail center
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Following an architectural competition, Italy's Stefano Boeri has been given the nod to design a "vertical forest" for Lausanne, Switzerland
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Following an architectural competition, Italy's Stefano Boeri has been given the nod to design a "vertical forest" for Lausanne, Switzerland
The novel tower will be dominated by greenery and boast some sustainable technology, including solar power and rainwater collection
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The novel tower will be dominated by greenery and boast some sustainable technology, including solar power and rainwater collection
If La Tour des Cedres (or Cedar Trees Tower) looks familiar, that's because it features a very similar design language to Boeri's previous award winning Milan-based Bosco Verticale
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If La Tour des Cedres (or Cedar Trees Tower) looks familiar, that's because it features a very similar design language to Boeri's previous award winning Milan-based Bosco Verticale
The mixed-use project will comprise 36 floors of luxury apartments, office spaces, and a 5,000 sq m (53,819 sq ft) retail center
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The mixed-use project will comprise 36 floors of luxury apartments, office spaces, and a 5,000 sq m (53,819 sq ft) retail center
Conceived as a vertical forest, it will rise to a total height of 117 m (383 ft) and boast over 3,000 sq m (32,291 sq ft) of greenery
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Conceived as a vertical forest, it will rise to a total height of 117 m (383 ft) and boast over 3,000 sq m (32,291 sq ft) of greenery
The greenery includes 100 cedar trees, 6,000 shrubs, and 18,000 plants – at least some of which will be local to the area
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The greenery includes 100 cedar trees, 6,000 shrubs, and 18,000 plants – at least some of which will be local to the area
Architectural model of the project
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Architectural model of the project
Architectural model of the project
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Architectural model of the project
The mixed-use project will comprise 36 floors of luxury apartments, office spaces, and a 5,000 sq m (53,819 sq ft) retail center
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The mixed-use project will comprise 36 floors of luxury apartments, office spaces, and a 5,000 sq m (53,819 sq ft) retail center
The highest floor will be given over to a panoramic restaurant
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The highest floor will be given over to a panoramic restaurant
The novel tower will be dominated by greenery and boast some sustainable technology, including solar power and rainwater collection
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The novel tower will be dominated by greenery and boast some sustainable technology, including solar power and rainwater collection

Following an architectural competition, Italy's Stefano Boeri has been given the nod to design a "vertical forest" for Lausanne, Switzerland. The novel tower will be dominated by greenery and boast some sustainable technology, including solar power and rainwater collection.

If La Tour des Cedres (or Cedar Trees Tower) looks familiar, that's because it features a very similar design language to Boeri's previous award-winning Milan-based Bosco Verticale. Described as a vertical forest by the architect, it will rise to a total height of 117 m (383 ft) and boast over 3,000 sq m (32,291 sq ft) of greenery, including 100 cedar trees, 6,000 shrubs, and 18,000 plants – at least some of which will be local to the area.

The mixed-use project will comprise 36 floors of luxury apartments, office spaces, and a 5,000 sq m (53,819 sq ft) retail center. The highest floor will be given over to a panoramic restaurant. Its Jenga-like exterior comprises cantilevered concrete planters and loggia. These are being developed by engineering firm BuroHappold as prefabricated units that connect directly to the tower's reinforced concrete frame.

La Tour des Cedres will boast some sustainable tech, including solar panels, ground source heat pumps and a rainwater collection system, which will no doubt lower the amount of grid-based energy the building requires to operate.

However, as TreeHugger's Lloyd Alter argues, with the significant amount of reinforced concrete required to safely house all that greenery so high up, it's debatable whether the building can really be considered sustainable in any meaningful sense.

DesignBoom reports that La Tour des Cedres is due to begin construction in 2017.

Sources: Stefano Boeri Architetti, BuroHappold, La Tours des Cedres

5 comments
Fairly Reasoner
I think many of us have witnessed trees losing substantially sized limbs to storm winds. Now, when those drop 36 floors ...
TracerZA
@Fairly Reasoner : forget the limbs, entire trees are going to fall off that building given that some of them appear to have no roots (considering their placement in the image).
cprofito@gmail.com
In the artist conception many spots have no root access / depth. some look like they may. The shrubs have more root depth area than many of the trees. But in a few years those closed systems will push the walls right out with constant wind vibration, root pressure, and weight...soil with water is HEAVY! Fertilizer oxidates, everything. Tree roots are fast growing and invasive. Better place for ice plants or tulips.
Douglas Bennett Rogers
These buildings will definitely be in the luxury market because of the load requirements for the trees!
POOL PUMPREAPAIR guy longwood
It's like saying a bonsai plant is going to crush whatever it's sitting on. The plants will obviously need managment, and I'm sure they will receive the best of care. I like the idea. although the "bird poop" might be a issue ?