Bicycles

Automatic bike lights have a safe Vibe

Automatic bike lights have a s...
The Vibe headlight, like the tail light, runs day and night
The Vibe headlight, like the tail light, runs day and night
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The Vibe headlight, like the tail light, runs day and night
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The Vibe headlight, like the tail light, runs day and night
There are two versions of the Vibe tail light, both of which run only in SafePulse mode
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There are two versions of the Vibe tail light, both of which run only in SafePulse mode

Bike lights … although they do make for safer cycling, they're also one more thing to think about. With that in mind, Light & Motion has just released its new Vibe system. It consists of a headlight and tail light that have no switches anywhere on them, instead relying on sensors to automatically turn on and off, and to switch between output modes.

Both lights can be stored in a pocket or bag when not in use, then inserted into twist mounts on the handlebars and seat post (or seat rails) when it's time to ride. Doing so activates motion sensors in them, which keep the lights on as long as the bike is moving. They don't go out until the bike has remained stationary for several minutes, which means they'll stay on while stopped at red lights, but go out when it's parked.

Additionally, an ambient light sensor in the headlight determines whether it's dark or light outside. As a result, during daylight hours, it will pulse for maximum visibility. At night, however, it goes to steady mode – according to the company, this increases motorists' depth perception, allowing them to more accurately locate the rider.

There are two versions of the Vibe tail light, both of which run only in SafePulse mode
There are two versions of the Vibe tail light, both of which run only in SafePulse mode

The US$50 headlight puts out 250 lumens in daytime "SafePulse" mode, or 200 in steady. One 2-hour USB battery charge is reportedly good for six hours of use in the first of those two modes, and two hours in the second.

There are two versions of the tail light, both of which run only in SafePulse mode, day or night. The $60 Pro puts out 100 lumens, and has a runtime of six hours. The $40 base model, on the other hand, has an output of 50 lumens but can run for up to 12 hours per charge. All three models are IP67 waterproof, meaning they can be submerged down to a depth of one meter (3.3 ft) for 30 minutes.

There's more information in the following video.

Source: Light & Motion

1 comment
MerlinGuy
Because switches on lights are just too complex? To difficult to use? Another answer in search of a problem.