Wearables

Audeze squeezes planar technology into first closed-back earphones

Audeze squeezes planar technol...
The Euclid in-ear monitors are the first closed-back planar magnetic earphones from Audeze
The Euclid in-ear monitors are the first closed-back planar magnetic earphones from Audeze
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The custom driver features a Uniforce voice coil, N50 magnet array, and Fazor wave guides
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The custom driver features a Uniforce voice coil, N50 magnet array, and Fazor wave guides
The Euclid in-ear monitors features milled aluminum housing capped with carbon fiber
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The Euclid in-ear monitors features milled aluminum housing capped with carbon fiber
The Euclid earphones are designed to deliver over 120-dB SPL, though Audeze recommends that listeners don't risk hearing health and stick to below 85 dB
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The Euclid earphones are designed to deliver over 120-dB SPL, though Audeze recommends that listeners don't risk hearing health and stick to below 85 dB
The Euclid in-ear monitors are the first closed-back planar magnetic earphones from Audeze
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The Euclid in-ear monitors are the first closed-back planar magnetic earphones from Audeze
View gallery - 4 images

I remember being impressed by the sonic clarity and wide soundstage of the first Audeze planar earphones I got to try at IFA in Berlin a few years back. Now the company has introduced a pair of closed-back in-ear monitors called Euclid for the promise of "superior detail retrieval and sonic accuracy with a soundstage and dynamic range so robust you'll forget you're listening to a closed-back in-ear."

The company's first closed-back in-ear monitors feature custom 18-mm planar magnetic drivers sporting a neodymium N50 magnet array, a Uniforce voice coil with ultra-thin diaphragm and Fazor wave guides (to reduce phasing and distortion) – all contained within milled aluminum housing in black with gold accenting and a carbon fiber faceplate.

The single planar design means that there are no crossovers for "superior coherency" across the whole 10-Hz to 50-kHz frequency range, and listeners can look forward to less than 0.1 percent total harmonic distortion and 105-dB sensitivity at the eardrum reference point.

The earphones can deliver a maximum sound pressure level of over 120 dB for "the highest dynamic range of any in-ear in its size category" – though the company recommends keeping the volume below 85 dB for the user's hearing health.

The custom driver features a Uniforce voice coil, N50 magnet array, and Fazor wave guides
The custom driver features a Uniforce voice coil, N50 magnet array, and Fazor wave guides

A braided cable is provided, which is hooked over and behind the ear before being connected to a source audio device, and Audeze has considered today's wireless audio trend too, with a Bluetooth cable attachment coming in March, along with 4.4-mm balanced cables. The earphones ship with three different styles of silicone tips as well as some Comply foam eartips.

The California-based audio specialist best known for its high-end audiophile and reference headphones has priced the Euclid in-ear monitors at US$1,299, which isn't quite as pricey as the company's LCDi4 flagship planar earphones but still throws the new ear candy squarely into the luxury/audiophile end of the market.

Product page: Euclid

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2 comments
2 comments
Signguy
No comments 'cause they're tooooo expensive.
GoodLife03
For a 20 times price increase you get a pair of earphones that could damage your hearing... no thank you, I will keep my high quality "normal" pair. If you limit the ability of hearing damage (110 db max), then I will consider to hear the extra sound quality in a couple of years from now when I become a millionaire :-)