Wearables

Augmented-reality contact lens is making its way toward production

Augmented-reality contact lens...
Here's HUD in your eye – the prototype Mojo Lens
Here's HUD in your eye – the prototype Mojo Lens
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An exploded diagram of the Mojo Lens
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An exploded diagram of the Mojo Lens
The Mojo Lens is designed to only display information when needed
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The Mojo Lens is designed to only display information when needed
Here's HUD in your eye – the prototype Mojo Lens
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Here's HUD in your eye – the prototype Mojo Lens
The Mojo Lens' MicroLED display
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The Mojo Lens' MicroLED display
View gallery - 4 images

Although augmented reality (AR) glasses are potentially very useful, they can also be awkward to wear and sometimes kind of funny-looking. California-based startup Mojo Vision is developing a sleeker, less-dorky alternative, in the form of an AR contact lens.

Currently in working prototype form, the company's Mojo Lens features what is being billed as "the smallest and densest dynamic display ever made." Superimposed over the wearer's view of the real world, moving text and graphics are delivered at a pixel pitch of over 14,000 ppi (pixels per inch) and a pixel density of over 200 million pixels per square inch.

Also built into the lens is "the world's most power-efficient image sensor optimized for computer vision," a radio transmitter/receiver, and motion sensors that both track the user's eye movements and stabilize the MicroLED display. And while the current prototype is wirelessly powered, we're told that plans call for the final version to incorporate a thin-film battery that should be good for one full day of use per charge.

An exploded diagram of the Mojo Lens
An exploded diagram of the Mojo Lens

The company has dubbed its contact lens technology Invisible Computing, as it can't be seen by onlookers, and it doesn't get in the user's way or hamper their movements.

As is the case with AR glasses, the displayed information will be wirelessly transmitted from the user's smartphone via a small, wearable relay device. That information could consist of things like text messages, turn-by-turn navigational cues, talking points for presentations, or directions for repairing machinery.

Of course, there are many other possible applications. For example, Mojo Vision is also working on a function for users with poor vision, in which overlaid graphics are used to enhance images of real-world objects. And yes, the lenses can be made to individual users' unique optical prescriptions.

The Mojo Lens' MicroLED display
The Mojo Lens' MicroLED display

So, when might you be able to snag a pair?

"Mojo is still in the process of designing, prototyping, and testing Mojo Lens, so it is premature to announce availability and pricing," Mojo Vision's Senior Vice President of Product and Marketing, Steve Sinclair, tells us. "Although we expect to complete development of the first generation of Mojo Lens over the next couple years, it is subject to regulatory approvals and certification by the FDA."

Source: Mojo Vision

View gallery - 4 images
6 comments
Lou N
This was the central technology of Vernor Vinge’s 2006 sci-fi novel “Rainbows End.” Interesting to see how it plays out in real life.
Robert Schreib
Perhaps they could add some kind of self-recharging mechanism to this device, so that the movements of the person wearing it, could empower its battery, like a self-winding watch does?
Aurin Ræder
The resolution is most likely 1920*1080 pixels, using a 3.5*1.75mm display (200million pixels/square inch gives 200.000.000/(25*25mm) = 320.000pixels/mm)
John Pettitt
Sign me up!
Signguy
Hmmm, more radiated energy on your body...no problem...
IvanWashington
i'd much rather have augmented reality overlays for my prescription eyewear.