Wearables

TCL NXTWEAR G specs let you take a 140-inch screen anywhere

TCL NXTWEAR G specs let you ta...
The AR glasses are able to project a 140-inch display in front of your eyes
The AR glasses are able to project a 140-inch display in front of your eyes
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The NXTWEAR G specs are powered by a phone, tablet, or laptop
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The NXTWEAR G specs are powered by a phone, tablet, or laptop
The AR glasses are able to project a 140-inch display in front of your eyes
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The AR glasses are able to project a 140-inch display in front of your eyes
The specs come with a cable and case
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The specs come with a cable and case
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Smart specs don't always need to be packed with technology to be useful – like the newly unveiled NXTWEAR G from TCL, which are powered by a smartphone, tablet, or laptop and act as an external screen for that device, one that can reach a virtual size of 140 inches.

As the bulk of the processing is done by the external device, the glasses themselves are able to be relatively lightweight, with no need for a battery or much in the way of electronics. The specs are fitted with two 1080p Micro OLED panels that can take whatever is on the connected mobile device and show it on a screen in augmented reality (AR).

This has the potential to work very well for video apps and games, for example, but TCL is also pushing it as a productivity device – one that you can view emails, documents, and presentations on. Head down to the local coffee shop and you don't necessarily need a laptop to get some work done, if you've got your phone and the NXTWEAR G with you.

Another potentially interesting use case is commuting or traveling, where space is limited. Rather than peering down at your phone or trying to open up a laptop, the smart specs would enable you to view whatever you wanted to view on a giant display that no one else around you would be able to see.

The NXTWEAR G specs are powered by a phone, tablet, or laptop
The NXTWEAR G specs are powered by a phone, tablet, or laptop

The 16:9 aspect ratio, 60-Hz refresh rate virtual display can also be resized and curved if required, giving you an even more immersive feel for watching movies and playing games. All you need to use them is a device with a USB-C DisplayPort output: that includes recent MacBook models, the iPad Pros, and a select number of smartphones, including the Samsung Galaxy S21.

The glasses weigh in at 100 g (0.22 lb) and they come with a USB-C cable, three nose pads, a protective carrying case, a lens frame to use with correction lenses, and a cleaning cloth so your view of your AR screen is always as crisp and as clear as possible.

There are stereo speakers built into the frames of the TCL NXTWEAR G specs, though it's worth pointing out that TCL itself recommends using some headphones instead, so don't expect the finest surround sound audio quality when you get these on your head.

The TCL NXTWEAR G glasses are launching in Australia first, in July, with future launches expected in Europe and then the US. What we don't have yet is a price, which will go a long way to determining just how appealing these smart specs are – especially with a growing number of competitors around. The video below has more.

TCL NXTWEAR G Wearable Display Smart Glasses is Finally here!

Product page: TCL NXTWEAR G

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3 comments
3 comments
piperTom
The video suggests that this big screen will be seen AS IF it's about 3 feet in front of the user. But that's only suggested; it's very important to know where my eye will need to focus. If the eye's lens needs to squeeze down to an inch in front, then the user will get eye strain in under a minute. But if the focus distance is the 3 feet suggested (and in AR!!) then... how in heck did they do that?
Imran Sheikh
Simple and thousand times better than wearing a stupid badly weight balanced box for virtual reality.
I just hope its not a vapor-ware.
ScienceFan
The 140 inch is meaningless. For these kinds of applications the viewing angle is much more relevant. And 1080p is only pleasant (sharp) to view when the field of view is small.