Automotive

The insane 1-megawatt electric on/off-road Miss R supercar

The insane 1-megawatt electric...
Xing Mobility's 1,000-kilowatt (1,341-hp) electric on-road/off-road supercar called the Miss R
Xing Mobility's 1,000-kilowatt (1,341-hp) electric on-road/off-road supercar called the Miss R
View 12 Images
Xing Mobility's 1,000-kilowatt (1,341-hp) electric on-road/off-road supercar called the Miss R
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Xing Mobility's 1,000-kilowatt (1,341-hp) electric on-road/off-road supercar called the Miss R
The Miss R is intended for both on- and off-road driving
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The Miss R is intended for both on- and off-road driving
The Miss R boasts four-wheel torque vectoring
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The Miss R boasts four-wheel torque vectoring
The Miss R's battery pack is made up of 98 Lego-like stackable modules each containing 42 lithium-ion cells, for a total of 4,116 cells
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The Miss R's battery pack is made up of 98 Lego-like stackable modules each containing 42 lithium-ion cells, for a total of 4,116 cells
Xing Mobility's in-house developed modular battery system is central to the Miss R
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Xing Mobility's in-house developed modular battery system is central to the Miss R
Miss R is currently undergoing initial testing and the prototype is slated to be completed in 2018
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Miss R is currently undergoing initial testing and the prototype is slated to be completed in 2018
A limited production run is scheduled to begin in 2019, with a purchase price of around US$1 million expected
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A limited production run is scheduled to begin in 2019, with a purchase price of around US$1 million expected
The Miss R is currently undergoing initial testing
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The Miss R is currently undergoing initial testing
The Miss R is being developed by Taipei-based electric powertrain startup Xing Mobility
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The Miss R is being developed by Taipei-based electric powertrain startup Xing Mobility
The Miss R is being developed by Taipei-based electric powertrain startup Xing Mobility
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The Miss R is being developed by Taipei-based electric powertrain startup Xing Mobility
The Miss R's battery pack is made up of 98 Lego-like stackable modules each containing 42 lithium-ion cells, for a total of 4,116 cells
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The Miss R's battery pack is made up of 98 Lego-like stackable modules each containing 42 lithium-ion cells, for a total of 4,116 cells
The Miss R boasts four-wheel torque vectoring
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The Miss R boasts four-wheel torque vectoring

Unlike Tesla, Taiwan's Xing Mobility isn't interested in becoming a car manufacturer. It just wants to prove the performance and reliability of its electric powertrain systems. And it's chosen to demonstrate its prowess with an absolutely ludicrous experiment – a 1,000-kilowatt (1,341-hp) electric on-road/off-road supercar called the Miss R.

Using four-wheel torque vectoring, the Miss R promises to accelerate from 0-100 km/h (0-62 mph) in just 1.8 seconds, which would see it pipping the 2020 Tesla Roadster by a 10th of a second and absolutely annihilating anything short of a purpose-built dragster from the internal combustion world.

Reaching 200 km/h (124 mph) will take about 5.1 seconds, which is how long it takes last year's Maserati Quattroporte to reach half that speed, and Miss R is expected to have a top speed between 270 and 300 km/h (168 and 186 mph).

Heat becomes a huge issue in ultra high-performance electrics, and Xing has safeguarded its battery packs from overheating using an unique liquid cooling system. Xing has created Lego-like stackable modules each containing 42 lithium-ion cells and packed 98 of them into the car for a total of 4,116 cells. All of these are immersed in 3M's Novec 7200 engineering fluid, which is totally non-conductive, great for heat transfer and also happens to suppress fire.

The Miss R's battery pack is made up of 98 Lego-like stackable modules each containing 42 lithium-ion cells, for a total of 4,116 cells
The Miss R's battery pack is made up of 98 Lego-like stackable modules each containing 42 lithium-ion cells, for a total of 4,116 cells

Xing tells us this liquid cooling system allows the extraction of a massive amount of power, equal to or slightly more than the Tesla, while using somewhere between 30-50 percent fewer cells. That means this car won't get near the Roadster's 998-km (620-mi) range, but it allows the entire battery pack to be swapped over in just five minutes.

Miss R is currently undergoing initial testing. The next test will boost things up to the terrifying full power of this thing, and the prototype is slated to be completed in 2018. A limited production run will then begin in 2019, with a purchase price of around US$1 million expected.

Oh, and yes, despite this thing's utterly obscene power and acceleration, it's designed for road, track AND off-road rally use. There's no doubt 1,341-hp off the road will turn a few hairs white. After all, Group B rally was shut down in the mid-80s when cars making less than half that figure were sending too many drivers to a fiery doom.

At a million dollars a pop, Miss R doesn't do much to prove the economics of electric performance – we'll leave that to the US$200k Tesla – but it's yet another demonstration of the wild, furious performance you can get when you swap hydrocarbons for electrons.

Check out an early test video below.

First Shakedown of "Miss E," XING Mobility's LMD-000E Electric Racer

Source: Xing Mobility

9 comments
Simon Gibson
Should this not be called 'on-road/on-track' as off-road infers a landscape suitable for 4x4's with good ground clearance and I don't see this vehicle driving through muddied fields or across any rough terrain.
SimonClarke
I love all of the work that companied are doing with electric vehicles. Yes it does beat the new Tesla Roadster by 0.1 second in the 0-60 but it is like comparing apples and oranges. as was stated, this car is five times the price with only two seats. Anyway, keep up the good work and I am looking forward to the day that I can drive my solar charged, all electric A-Class RV.
smackoz
Hmmm... http://money.cnn.com/2017/05/05/autos/toyota-worlds-fastest-suv/index.html Sure not production but still not bad for a hydrocarbon guzzler.
smackoz
You might what to compare the energy densities of these two fuel sources for cars before you write off hydrocarbons. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_density Lithium batteries barely make a show of things compared to hydrocarbons as a fuel source.
navmed
The car looks very promising. The video is terrible.
TomWatson
Boring video for such an awesome machine. Bad promotional video. I want to see speed and cornering FAST.
Grunchy
Nice car, but I still want Aptera. Dammit!
Tom Lee Mullins
I think that is both cool and green. I think it would need more ground clearance to be considered an off road racer (unless one means smooth dirt tracks?).
b@man
168 mph? Must need overdrive:)