Architecture

EU's first 3D-printed house is the most livable we've seen to date

The 3D Housing 05 project at this year's Salone del Mobile design expo
The 3D Housing 05 project at this year's Salone del Mobile design expo
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3D Housing 05 was conceived to demonstrate the efficacy of 3D-printing technology
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3D Housing 05 was conceived to demonstrate the efficacy of 3D-printing technology
3D Housing 05's bathroom
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3D Housing 05's bathroom
3D Housing 05's bathroom
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3D Housing 05's bathroom
3D Housing 05's kitchen
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3D Housing 05's kitchen
3D Housing 05's main living area, which has a table installed 
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3D Housing 05's main living area, which has a table installed 
3D Housing 05 was made similarly to other 3D-printed houses we've seen
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3D Housing 05 was made similarly to other 3D-printed houses we've seen
A cement mixture was extruded from a nozzle layer by layer to build up 3D Housing 05's walls, before the doors, windows and such were finished by humans
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A cement mixture was extruded from a nozzle layer by layer to build up 3D Housing 05's walls, before the doors, windows and such were finished by humans
The 3D Housing 05 project at this year's Salone del Mobile design expo
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The 3D Housing 05 project at this year's Salone del Mobile design expo
The actual printing process for 3D Housing 05 took around 48 hours
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The actual printing process for 3D Housing 05 took around 48 hours
3D Housing 05 was built using ua robotic manipulator mounted on a movable base, rather than the more typical static 3D printer
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3D Housing 05 was built using ua robotic manipulator mounted on a movable base, rather than the more typical static 3D printer
3D Housing 05 comprises a total of 100 sq m (1,076 sq ft) of floorspace
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3D Housing 05 comprises a total of 100 sq m (1,076 sq ft) of floorspace
A cement mixture was extruded from a nozzle layer by layer to build up 3D Housing 05's walls, before the doors, windows and such were finished by humans
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A cement mixture was extruded from a nozzle layer by layer to build up 3D Housing 05's walls, before the doors, windows and such were finished by humans
3D Housing 05's roof terrace is covered in greenery 
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3D Housing 05's roof terrace is covered in greenery 
3D Housing 05 was conceived to demonstrate the efficacy of 3D-printing technology
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3D Housing 05 was conceived to demonstrate the efficacy of 3D-printing technology
The actual printing process for 3D Housing 05 took around 48 hours
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The actual printing process for 3D Housing 05 took around 48 hours
3D Housing 05 features a roof terrace accessed from the outside
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3D Housing 05 features a roof terrace accessed from the outside

Arup and CLS Architetti's much-anticipated 3D-printed house has been revealed in Milan during this year's Salone del Mobile design fair. While still just a prototype, the project looks like the most fully realized and livable 3D-printed house we've seen to date, with a larger, more complex design than other examples like the proof-of-concept from New Story and Icon.

To recap, the house, dubbed 3D Housing 05, was conceived to demonstrate the efficacy of 3D printing technology and constructed much like other 3D-printed architecture projects. A cement mixture was extruded from a nozzle in layers to build up the home's walls, before the doors, windows and other finishing touches were completed by humans.

One notable difference compared with previous 3D-printed projects we've seen is that 3D Housing 05 makes use of a robotic manipulator mounted on a movable base, instead of a typical static printer, offering increased flexibility. Designed by CyBe Construction, the bot costs €349,000 (US$432,000), so is definitely geared toward firms rather than hobbyists.

3D Housing 05's bathroom
3D Housing 05's bathroom

The dwelling comprises a total of 100 sq m (1,076 sq ft) of floorspace, divided into a living area with a table and chairs, a bedroom with double bed, kitchen area that includes a kitchenette and a small dining area, and a particularly plush-looking bathroom with bath, toilet, sink and seating. The interior furniture and fittings look very high-end and include brass window frames and even a chandelier.

The 3D-printed house also has a terrace roof reached by exterior steps, while some greenery softens its otherwise rough appearance.

The 3D Housing 05 project will be dismantled and relocated once Salone del Mobile comes to a close. Arup continues to be very keen on exploring 3D printing technology and is involved in other similar projects, including that 3D-printed steel bridge we recently reported on.

Sources: CLS Architetti, Arup

5 comments
Tom Lee Mullins
I think that looks really nice. I would not mind living in that.
Nik
Looks fine, but getting planning permission for that through the average suburban planning department in the UK, is as likely as pigs growing wings. That corrugated surface, is guaranteed to collect dirt, and look absolutely terrible in a very short time, so plastering inside and out, plus a washable paint surface, would be essential. Anything that can provide homes, rapidly and cheaply, must be good.
Vernon Miles Kerr
Now we're getting somewhere! This house is attractive, inside and out. On the inside the walls have a pleasing texture. It's almost as if they are fitted with an expensive "corduroy" wall covering. Actually, it looks quite elegant. I agree with Tom Lee Mullins, where do I sign?
BrianK56
That is nice, I wonder if they can print straight walls.
russell
Cute, a million yrs ago round homes were tried, they were called domes, and exhibited the same issues, problematic wall surfaces, custom furnishings, problematic adaptions for fittings like doors and window, running utilities. Domes did inherently solve one problem the 3D printing fad doesn't, Domes are structurally self supporting, very much so. Here's a short list of issues printed building need to address before they move beyond amusing trade fair demos Structure - presumably via integrated reinforcing, presumably a polymer that will replace rebar and be spray one drop at a time like a different colored ink to form the needed structural grid in walls. INSULATION - how is it that is not being sprayed along with the walls and finishes with cement plaster? Not that I'm a believe if petro chemical foam insul, it's indefensible environmentally, embedded energy and CO2 is enormous. Utility chases / conduits / ducts etc, which again should be formable by using polymer spray for the wall and nothing in the void area, unless you want to try spraying in pull lines for wires / tubing. Integrated and fully secured sub framing at openings for windows, doors, etc. Again a sprayable polymer that would create a "plastic" lumber sub frame would work. Smooth finishes Final finish So.... why is no one doing 3d printing bothering to implement even the most basic of these necessary features - concentrating instead on pouring cement. Finally of course the 800 lb gorilla, floors and roofs, small object 3d printing can accommodate fully 3 D shapes with hollow insides, which is what a house is, yet, again, not even being attempted. It would just take side spraying structural elements across spaces one drop at time, along with "dissolvable" temp bracing periodically. Ideally, you'd probably aim for a self supporting skin like a dome, but much flatter, between ribs, which was in days gone past called a Gustav?(Guastavino) tile arch used for ceilings / floors.
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