3D Printing

3D-printed Cryptide sneakers are designed to leave a mythical mark

3D-printed Cryptide sneakers a...
The 3D-printed Cryptide sneakers feature a super-flexible sock up top, and a highly technical, deforming plated sole designed to leave mystifying footprints
The 3D-printed Cryptide sneakers feature a super-flexible sock up top, and a highly technical, deforming plated sole designed to leave mystifying footprints
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Individual toes deform to leave clawprints
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Individual toes deform to leave clawprints
Plated sole is designed to deform
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Plated sole is designed to deform
The sole is designed to leave the footprints of a mythical beast
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The sole is designed to leave the footprints of a mythical beast
The 3D-printed Cryptide sneakers feature a super-flexible sock up top, and a highly technical, deforming plated sole designed to leave mystifying footprints
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The 3D-printed Cryptide sneakers feature a super-flexible sock up top, and a highly technical, deforming plated sole designed to leave mystifying footprints
The shoes seem to be designed to take some sort of closure system
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The shoes seem to be designed to take some sort of closure system
The outrageous Infinity bicycle concept, with a single, deforming tire for both virtual wheels
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The outrageous Infinity bicycle concept, with a single, deforming tire for both virtual wheels
View gallery - 6 images

German designer Stephan Henrich has a wild, high-detail and futuristic approach to form, and his take on the well-worn trope of 3D-printed sneakers is a great example. Little more than a form-fitting sock up top, the elevated sole features dynamically deforming phalanges designed to leave bystanders mystified when they see your tracks.

Printed in a single run per shoe, the Cryptide sneakers are predominantly designed to show off Sintratec's S2 3D printing system, as well as the company's rubber-like TPE elastomer material. Thinner structures are very flexible, while thicker ones can absorb considerably more energy before bending, hence the top of the shoe is super-thin and perforated for breathability, while the sole is more structural, designed specifically to cope with expected forces generated by walking and running.

Henrich separates out all five toes on the plated sole design, each able to roll forward to create the impression of a sharp claw. Your footprints in dirt or sand will therefore make people wonder whether Bigfoot's been in the neighborhood, and that's indeed what gave the Cryptides their name: a cryptid is a mythical beast.

The sole is designed to leave the footprints of a mythical beast
The sole is designed to leave the footprints of a mythical beast

The shoes appear to be designed to run a pair of ratcheting tie-downs to close them securely, although these have not been fitted as yet. Henrich says it should be reasonably simple to 3D-scan people's feet and create a set of Cryptides in the perfect dimensions, but realistically these shoes will likely remain a Sintratec showpiece, and thus pretty much as good as mythical beasts from the perspective of actual shoe buyers. That's OK; from the video, they don't seem ready to work particularly well, deforming in some odd directions when stood on.

Still, they're very eye-catching; Henrich's style is technical and daring, and we can't resist showing you this outrageous design he put forward back in 2009 for an "Infinity" cruiser AWD bicycle, running a single, modular tire that's held in place by hydraulic spreaders to form virtual front and rear wheels.

The outrageous Infinity bicycle concept, with a single, deforming tire for both virtual wheels
The outrageous Infinity bicycle concept, with a single, deforming tire for both virtual wheels

Completely impractical? Sure. But we sure do love ourselves a good sideways idea, and this is about as sideways as it gets. More recently, Henrich has been working on a "3D Cocooner" designed to print three-dimensional lattice shapes out of UV-cured e-glass without any supports, and a spider-like robotic gardener specializing in fungi. Somebody get this guy a job on a sci-fi-movie.

Check out a short video below.

"The Cryptide Sneaker" – Fully SLS 3D printed Shoe | Designed by Stephan Henrich

Source: Sintratec

View gallery - 6 images
3 comments
3 comments
PhilippeHolthuizen
Great to finally see this shoe appear on New Atlas, and much respect to Stephan for the cool design!

I really love the sole aspect of it, with the separate toes and how the scales articulate and would grip the terrain. But I can also see much room for improvement as, just like Loz mentioned, the midsole structure seems too soft. I actually think that these might feel a bit like a sponge, robbing you of energy through their deformation. I do hope Stephan gets a chance to refine his design with Sintratec.

ljaques
Love that shoe! LOL
alan c
The shoe is a great way of showing off both designer skills and the print technology but in real life I wouldn't want to be hosing the dog poo out of that tread.