Bicycles

A2B launches Entz e-bike with frame-integrated motor and gearless shifting

The all-new A2B Entz is among the very first e-bikes to feature Continental's CONTI eBike drive system
The all-new A2B Entz is among the very first e-bikes to feature Continental's CONTI eBike drive system
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The A2B Entz debuts at Eurobike 2014
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The A2B Entz debuts at Eurobike 2014
The Entz will hit the market in 2015
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The Entz will hit the market in 2015
The Entz uses the all-new CONTI e-drive
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The Entz uses the all-new CONTI e-drive
The A2B Entz debuts at Eurobike 2014
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The A2B Entz debuts at Eurobike 2014
The Entz will be available in standard and Deluxe models
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The Entz will be available in standard and Deluxe models
The all-new A2B Entz is among the very first e-bikes to feature Continental's CONTI eBike drive system
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The all-new A2B Entz is among the very first e-bikes to feature Continental's CONTI eBike drive system
The all-new A2B Entz offers a 250-watt pedal-assist drive
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The all-new A2B Entz offers a 250-watt pedal-assist drive
A2B Entz
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A2B Entz
The CONTI remote control is integrated into the grip
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The CONTI remote control is integrated into the grip
Continental CONTI diagram
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Continental CONTI diagram

Electric bike specialist A2B introduced its latest creation at last month's Eurobike show. Named after the American inventor of the electromagnetic transmission, Justus B. Entz, the Entz e-bike benefits from a new, neatly integrated Continental e-drive that saves weight while promising a sharp electric-assisted ride.

The aluminum-framed Entz is among the very first e-bikes to feature Continental's CONTI eBike drive system, which also debuted at Eurobike 2014. The CONTI packages a motor, backlit display, remote control and battery into one system, and A2B reckons it's one of the lightest, smallest, most powerful e-drive packages out there.

The CONTI drive's central motor is integrated directly into the Entz's frame. That 7.5-lb (3.4-kg) motor packs 250 watts of pedelec power and can engage the rear wheel through the buyer's choice of manual Shimano Alfline eight-speed hub or manual/automatic NuVinci Harmony gearless hub. The motor powers the bike to speeds of up to 15.5 mph (25 km/h).

The all-new A2B Entz offers a 250-watt pedal-assist drive
The all-new A2B Entz offers a 250-watt pedal-assist drive

The Entz uses a rear carrier-mounted lithium-ion battery that offers up to 62 miles (100 km) worth of pedelec range and charges in 2.5 to 3 hours. The rider controls the system by way of Continental's Eurobike/Red Dot Award-winning remote control, which is integrated seamlessly in the handlebar grip. The backlit display shows battery life, speed, distance and other metrics.

Other Entz components include a Suntour suspension fork with 2.5 in (63 mm) of travel and 24 x 2.35-in Kenda Krusader tires. A2B lists the curb weight at 61.5 lb (27.9 kg).

The new Entz is a redesign of an Entz model that was supposed to launch last year. A2B told us that it had technical issues with the 2013 Entz that meant it never started production on it. To create the new model, it tweaked the frame, replaced the original e-drive with the new CONTI system and changed out other components.

The German-built Entz will launch in Europe in January and the US in March of 2015. The Deluxe model will include the NuVinci gearless hub and a larger 14.5 Ah battery that offers the 62-mile (100-km) range versus the standard model's 11.25 Ah battery and 46.5-mile (75-km) range. Final pricing has not been set, but A2B expects to price the standard model at US$3,999 and the Deluxe at $4,999. The bike will come in both 16- and 20-in frame sizes.

Source: A2B, Continental

5 comments
zevulon
i've been following a2b for years....and despite how much nicer and more functional this bike may be-----all of the effort and engineering is going to waste. this technology would be widely in demand if they upped the power to allow these bikes to reach 28 miles and hour by throttle only. the pedals are an afterthought. the gears are unneccesary and merely add weight , maintenance, cost and complexity. the battery is pointlessly kept on the back while it would be better off integrated into the frame, for weight balance and lowering center of gravity. the 250 watt level is at this point, a european underpowered standard. ebikes are going to replace 50cc mopeds eventually. an increase in battery power density and , more importantly, in the speed of charging ( without affective battery life or , of course overheating it ) -----will eventulaly yield a battery that charges twice as fast and is 50% more power dense per volume and weight. the idea that legislation or other factors are dictating performance modification is a sad waste of resources into needless extra iterations of the design. thankfully a2b got rid of their horrible square edged tire on this model, prone to all sorts of problematic slip outs and turning problems. good job on that MAJOR improvement. sometimes the simplest things are the best.
Slowburn
Why do they always make structurally compromised frames the standard double triangle will provide greater strength for less weight. @ zevulon While I have no use for electric vehicles other than powered wheelchairs the external battery pack allows you to stash the bike in a conventional bike rack and carry the battery to where it can be charged. The gears just might come in handy when you are peddling.
Jugen
The frame design is inherently high of fatigue failure. Not having a seat stay means the moment in the chain stay is very high. I've done a lot of work with FEM computer simulation and I can tell you the stress concentrations will be high were the chain stay meets the frame. Aluminium over repeated loads has a tendency to work harden, although it UTS will increase its yield strength will fall of the chart. Thus A2B will be spending a lot of time and money recalling their bikes after someone has a serious accident. This is what I would call quite a major engineering overlook, can't possibly begin to imagination what other engineering aspects have also been equally overlooked.
Jim8
A couple of observations: A bike that goes 28 with throttle only is not a bicycle, it is a motorcycle and needs to be registered and have all safety items, like break lights, turn signals and the rest. A bike with a 250 watt motor that does 15.5 and weighs 62 pounds is nothing special, in fact there are an awful lot of them out there. As to 250 being "underpowered" I have several bikes I'm testing and selling, and I've decided 250 is the perfect hub motor as there is a tradeoff between weight and range. If you demand more power, you are now chasing that with more weight. I have found it's best to stop that endless circle at the beginning. The bike in this article is slick looking, but has the weight in the wrong place, weighs too much, and as too many unnecessary gimmicks to be treated seriously. I have a full sized folding mountain bike that fits in the trunk of my Honda Civic, has a range of 44.5 miles at low power level (14 mph) and 27 miles at high (20 mph) and weighs about 50 pounds. 250 watts is what makes that possible, and is plenty of power unless you really want a motorcycle, then you should buy one. An option is 350 watts, but what do you think happens to the range, or the weight if you get a bigger battery? I also have several bikes that weigh less than 30 pounds, and that is a far more fun bike to ride than any 62 pound thing can be.
rpunzell
Why would anyone spend %5000 for an electric bike.