Computers

Acer Swift 7 laptop is the new king of thin

The Acer Swift 7 is less than 1 cm thick
The Acer Swift 7 is less than 1 cm thick
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The Acer Swift 7 is less than 1 cm thick 
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The Acer Swift 7 is less than 1 cm thick 
Battery life is pegged at around 9 hours
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Battery life is pegged at around 9 hours
Acer has chosen black and gold for its latest laptop
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Acer has chosen black and gold for its latest laptop
The Acer Swift 7 is kitted with Intel Core processors, and measures less than 1 cm thick
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The Acer Swift 7 is kitted with Intel Core processors, and measures less than 1 cm thick
The Acer Swift 7 is less than 1 cm thick
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The Acer Swift 7 is less than 1 cm thick
Acer has managed to squeeze in a 7th Generation Intel i5 processor, up to 8 GB of RAM, and  256 GB of SSD storage
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Acer has managed to squeeze in a 7th Generation Intel i5 processor, up to 8 GB of RAM, and  256 GB of SSD storage
The Acer Swift 7 is kitted with Intel Core processors, and measures less than 1 cm thick
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The Acer Swift 7 is kitted with Intel Core processors, and measures less than 1 cm thick
Being slim and light does bring a few compromises, with available ports being the first casualties
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Being slim and light does bring a few compromises, with available ports being the first casualties
The Swift 7's 1.1 kg (2.48 lb) black-and-gold aluminum body sports a 13.3-inch screen Gorilla Glass screen
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The Swift 7's 1.1 kg (2.48 lb) black-and-gold aluminum body sports a 13.3-inch screen Gorilla Glass screen
A fingerprint scanner is included, but a backlit keyboard is optional
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A fingerprint scanner is included, but a backlit keyboard is optional

When Apple launched the Macbook, it immediately set tongues wagging with its super-slim chassis. Since then, the race to get thinner and lighter has really hotted up. The 10.4 mm (0.41 in) HP Spectre was labelled the world's slimmest laptop earlier this year, but Acer has used IFA 2016 to steal that crown with the 9.98 mm (0.39 in) Swift 7.

Despite being less than 1 cm thick, the Swift 7 still looks solid on spec sheet. Power comes from a 7th Generation Intel i5 processor, coupled with up to 8 GB of RAM, and storage is handled by a 256 GB SSD. You can expect around 9 hours from the battery. Although you can buy an HP Spectre with an i5 processor and 256 GB of storage, it's also available with an Intel i7 processor and 512 GB of SSD storage if you're willing to pay.

The Swift 7's 1.1 kg (2.48 lb) black-and-gold aluminum body sports a 13.3-inch screen Gorilla Glass screen, providing an extra degree of scratch and shatter resistance.

Being slim and light does bring a few compromises, with available ports being the first casualties
Being slim and light does bring a few compromises, with available ports being the first casualties

Being slim and light does bring a few compromises, though, with ports usually being the first casualties. In this case, there are two USB-C ports – that's twice as many ports as you'll find on a Macbook, but it's still one less than you'd find on the HP Spectre. There's also no mention of a bundled USB-C hub like the one Zenbook 3 buyers get with their computer.

Also packed into the body is a fingerprint scanner and a backlit keyboard is optional, while wireless connectivity is handled by twin 802.11 ac MU-MIMO Wi-Fi receivers.

Pricing for the Swift 7 kicks off at US$999, and American buyers will be able to get their hands on one in October. It will be sold alongside the less expensive, less powerful, thicker Swift 5, Swift 3 and Swift 1.

Check out Acer's launch video for the Swift 7 below.

Source: Acer

Acer | Swift 7 Laptop

2 comments
pmshah
All this slimming down is fine but screws up people like me who do not like to do any critical or confidential work on wifi. Where does it leave up old style RJ45 strictly wired internet users? Or about time they stared including a usb-c to RJ-45 adapter.
DaveCummins
Don't want uber-thin, want uber-durable, a 2.5" bay for 2nd SSD, full sized USB3 ports, etc. People need to get over their silly monkey fascination with the thinnest or lightest or shiniest gadget. It's not like we have to choose between this and a 4cm thick, 10lb boat anchor. @ pmshah, I doubt you're really doing anything important enough that anyone would bother trying to decrypt your wifi, but in those cases, it's also why your applications should use a 2nd layer of encryption. It just isn't an issue unless You're Doing It Wrong. There is an extra amount of caution needed on public wifi to avoid man in the middle type attacks, but that is a case where you didn't have an ethernet option at all. If you want a USB-c to RJ-45 adapter, go ahead and buy one. Why should it raise the price for everyone else to include one with the laptop if most people wouldn't use it. The thin and light crowd is probably the last to want a dongle handing off. Personally, I wouldn't want one either because those tiny ports are relatively fragile, can tear off the mainboard just from repeated friction of insertion and removal. These days you don't have to abuse a port to have it fail, which is a shame. On larger laptops they often put the ports on a daughterboard so if/when they fail, just that one relatively inexpensive board can be replaced instead of the entire mainboard.