Smartwatches

Automatically curbing Apple Watch notifications seems like a wise way to prevent distracted driving

The Apple Watch Series 2 has a few user-friendly options for replying to texts, but it's still not safe to do so while driving
The Apple Watch Series 2 has a few user-friendly options for replying to texts, but it's still not safe to do so while driving
View 2 Images
The Apple Watch Series 2 has a few user-friendly options for replying to texts, but it's still not safe to do so while driving
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The Apple Watch Series 2 has a few user-friendly options for replying to texts, but it's still not safe to do so while driving
In this situation, you don't need notifications on your wrist, too
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In this situation, you don't need notifications on your wrist, too

There are times when at-a-glance notifications do more harm than good – driving is one of them. A recently awarded patent suggests that the Apple Watch could eventually prevent this distraction/nuisance by automatically detecting when you're driving and following suit by halting notifications. Considering the known dangers of distracted driving, it seems like a wise way to approach smartwatch safety.

According to the patent, Apple proposes a method by which the Apple Watch's motion detectors can detect when you're driving. It then provides a reduction in notifications that can be customized by the user. Notifications could be re-routed to the vehicle's speakers, for example, or they could be restricted to only emergency and other types of high-priority alerts.

In this situation, you don't need notifications on your wrist, too
In this situation, you don't need notifications on your wrist, too

Of course, Apple and other consumer tech companies file many, many patents that never come to fruition. It's wise to take this possibility with plenty of grains of salt. Considering there are similar measures in place such as limiting notifications through CarPlay, however, this is one development that does not require a radical stretch of the imagination.

Source: US Patent & Trademark Office, via 9to5Mac

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