Architecture

Tall timber building offers sustainability in Sweden

Tall timber building offers su...
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building has a total floorspace of 7,500 sq m (roughly 80,000 sq ft)
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building has a total floorspace of 7,500 sq m (roughly 80,000 sq ft)
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building is located next to a lake in Västerås, Sweden
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building is located next to a lake in Västerås, Sweden
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building has been designed so that it can be easily dismantled and recycled if required
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building has been designed so that it can be easily dismantled and recycled if required
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building has a total floorspace of 7,500 sq m (roughly 80,000 sq ft)
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building has a total floorspace of 7,500 sq m (roughly 80,000 sq ft)
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building is topped by a staggered green roof
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building is topped by a staggered green roof
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building is nine floors high
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building is nine floors high
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building's apartments have a balcony each
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building's apartments have a balcony each
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building's balconies offer views over the nearby lake
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building's balconies offer views over the nearby lake
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building's apartments feature generous glazing
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The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building's apartments feature generous glazing
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C.F. Møller Architects has designed what it calls Sweden's tallest wooden building. Located next to a lake in Västerås, the residential project has been specifically designed so that it can be dismantled and recycled if required.

Unlike other recent timber towers we've covered that feature a concrete core, such as PLP Architecture's Tree House for example, the Kajstaden Tall Timber Building is constructed almost completely from CLT (cross-laminated timber), including its walls, joists, balconies and even its elevator and stairwell shafts.

"It took an average of three days per floor for three craftsmen to raise the frame," says the firm. "Mechanical joints with screws have been used, which means that the building can be taken apart so that the materials can be recycled. The total carbon dioxide saving is estimated to be 550 tonnes [616 US tons] of CO2 when using solid wood instead of concrete."

The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building's apartments feature generous glazing
The Kajstaden Tall Timber Building's apartments feature generous glazing

As of writing we're awaiting word back from C.F. Møller Architects as to its exact height, but it has a total floorspace of 7,500 sq m (roughly 80,000 sq ft) spread over eight floors (taking into account its double-height apartments, it's actually nine floors high). For comparison, the world's tallest timber tower, Norway's Mjøstårnet, rises to 18 floors.

The building's exterior is defined by its boxy design and is topped by a staggered green roof. The interior contains four apartments on each floor, each of which boast generous glazing and a balcony. In a nice touch, the residents are offered an electric boat sharing scheme for the nearby lake.

Residents began moving into the Kajstaden Tall Timber Building in early 2019, though the project was only recently photographed in full due to the wait for the landscaping to be finished.

Source: CF Møller Architects

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1 comment
alexD
That is nice, but the higher ceilings like that is adding to the wastefulness: lower it 1/3 at least and they will save in wood and heating costs... not to mention how much easier would be to change a light bulb....