Architecture

Edge viewing point lets visitors see NYC from above

Edge viewing point lets visito...
Edge juts out almost 80 ft (roughly 25 m) from the 100th floor of KPF’s skyscraper 30 Hudson Yards
Edge juts out almost 80 ft (roughly 25 m) from the 100th floor of KPF’s skyscraper 30 Hudson Yards
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Edge juts out almost 80 ft (roughly 25 m) from the 100th floor of KPF’s skyscraper 30 Hudson Yards
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Edge juts out almost 80 ft (roughly 25 m) from the 100th floor of KPF’s skyscraper 30 Hudson Yards
Edge is enclosed by angled glass panels and visitors can lean up against them if so inclined
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Edge is enclosed by angled glass panels and visitors can lean up against them if so inclined
View of NYC from Edge's east side
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View of NYC from Edge's east side
View of NYC from Edge's south side
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View of NYC from Edge's south side
Edge is enclosed by 79 glass panels manufactured in Germany and finished in Italy that measure 9 ft (2.7 m) tall and weigh 1,200 lb (544 kg) each
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Edge is enclosed by 79 glass panels manufactured in Germany and finished in Italy that measure 9 ft (2.7 m) tall and weigh 1,200 lb (544 kg) each
View gallery - 5 images

If you’d like to experience New York City’s famous skyline from a different perspective, the Hudson Yards development now has a new attraction to join the Vessel. Named Edge, it’s situated 1,131 ft (344 m) above the ground and offers views of the surrounding city, New Jersey, and New York State stretching up to 80 miles (128 km), when conditions are right.

Edge is the Western Hemisphere’s highest outdoor observation point and was created for developer Related Companies by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF), which is the firm responsible for a lot of the world’s tallest buildings. The Rockwell Group handled interior design.

The 765,000 lb (346,998 kg) observation deck is securely bolted onto the east and south-facing exterior of KPF’s 30 Hudson Yards skyscraper and juts out almost 80 ft (roughly 25 m).

Edge is enclosed by angled glass panels and visitors can lean up against them if so inclined
Edge is enclosed by angled glass panels and visitors can lean up against them if so inclined

Visitors enter the skyscraper at ground level and take a 52-second-long elevator ride to reach the observation point. This measures 7,500 sq ft (roughly 700 sq m) and is enclosed by a total of 79 glass panels that were manufactured in Germany and finished in Italy, and measure 9 ft (2.7 m) tall and weigh 1,200 lb (544 kg) each. The panels are set at a 6.6-degree angle leaning outwards and those feeling brave can press up against them to gaze out over the city. Additionally, a 225-sq-ft (20-sq-m) glass floor section is installed, letting visitors gaze down at the people milling around on the sidewalks 100 floors below.

There is also a restaurant, bar, and events space nearby that’s reached by climbing a few steps.

Edge recently officially opened for business, but has subsequently been temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. When it does reopen for business, online tickets will cost US$38 for non-local adults, with kids coming in at a slightly reduced $33.

Source: Related Companies

View gallery - 5 images
3 comments
RobC
Yikes! Lean on the glass? You must be joking. Not in a million years!
ljaques
Poor RobC. It's exhiliarating! I stuck my head out through the wide metal fencing on top of the Empire State Building and looked straight down. It was only 12 floors, though, because the base was huge, with smaller rectangular floors on top. ESB was $8 vs the $12 for Twin Tower visits (1998, RIP), and these guys want $38 a head?
Douglas Rogers
If it had gambling the elevator trip would be free!