Architecture

Henning Larsen plans nature-filled timber neighborhood

Henning Larsen plans nature-fi...
Fælledby is described as Copenhagen's first all-timber neighborhood by Henning Larsen
Fælledby is described as Copenhagen's first all-timber neighborhood by Henning Larsen
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Fælledby's roads will be made relatively narrow and all parking will be underground
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Fælledby's roads will be made relatively narrow and all parking will be underground
40 percent of the 18.1 hectare (44 acre) Fælledby masterplan will be left underdeveloped to allow nature to thrive
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40 percent of the 18.1 hectare (44 acre) Fælledby masterplan will be left underdeveloped to allow nature to thrive
Fælledby's 7,000 residents will be split into three village-like areas that are never more than two minutes walk away from nature
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Fælledby's 7,000 residents will be split into three village-like areas that are never more than two minutes walk away from nature
Fælledby is described as Copenhagen's first all-timber neighborhood by Henning Larsen
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Fælledby is described as Copenhagen's first all-timber neighborhood by Henning Larsen
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The increased popularity of timber construction in recent years has resulted in lots of wooden skyscrapers, but Henning Larsen offers something a little different with its plan for an entire timber neighborhood – that is, all buildings would be made primarily from wood. Assuming it's built, the Fælledby development will house 7,000 people in an idyllic nature-filled community in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The product of an architecture competition, the Fælledby masterplan was created in partnership with engineers MOE and will be divided into three circular "villages" surrounded by greenery, in an attempt to offer residents the experience of living in a small rural area. An impressive 40 percent of available land will be left underdeveloped for flora and fauna to thrive, including insects, turtles, and deer.

"Deciding to build in the natural landscape around Fælledby comes with a commitment to balance people with nature," says Signe Kongebro, Partner at Henning Larsen. "Specifically, this means that our new district will be Copenhagen’s first to be built fully in wood, and incorporating natural habitats that encourage richer growth for plants and animals. With the rural village as an archetype, we're creating a city where biodiversity and active recreation define a sustainable pact between people and nature."

Fælledby's 7,000 residents will be split into three village-like areas that are never more than two minutes walk away from nature
Fælledby's 7,000 residents will be split into three village-like areas that are never more than two minutes walk away from nature

The houses themselves will be constructed using wood (the plan is for the wood to be sustainably sourced) and come in single and family versions, with 37 variations, ranging in size, height, and style. Their facades will host birdhouses and other habitats, and they'll be grouped together so that every 150 or so people will have their own community garden or greenhouse to maintain.

"Nature is wholly integrated within Fælledby’s landscaping and architecture: nests for songbirds and bats are built into the walls of houses, new ponds in the center of each of Fælledby’s three communities offer a habitat for frogs and salamanders, and community gardens create new flowers to attract butterflies, to name a few," adds the firm's press release. "Narrowed roads and underground parking within the plan reduce vehicle traffic and visibility, making nature the focal point."

40 percent of the 18.1 hectare (44 acre) Fælledby masterplan will be left underdeveloped to allow nature to thrive
40 percent of the 18.1 hectare (44 acre) Fælledby masterplan will be left underdeveloped to allow nature to thrive

The project is currently in the planning stage and Henning Larsen has been in talks with city officials for some time with a view to seeing it realized.

Source: Henning Larsen

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6 comments
guzmanchinky
Denmark is so beautiful, but it's hard to imagine more depressing weather...
paul314
Forward to the 19th Century! I sure hope they're sprinklered all to heck. There's a reason stone and brick buildings are the vast majority of what survives from previous eras.
danphilips@rogers.com
what about *FIRE* ?
Douglas Rogers
If they can make these fire, insect, and rot resistant, they will be a good way to sequester carbon.
neoneuron
The us"A" can't incorporate nature. They want to build up every parcel of land. They are greedy. Period..
Nelson Hyde Chick
So we are going to be building more and more buildings out of wood, but our forests are already being decimated by humanity's need for wood. This nis just another example of how nothing can get better but only worse as humanity swells by billions more. The only true fix for life to flourish on this planet is fewer humans.