Architecture

Sustainable Lego Campus makes space for work and play

Sustainable Lego Campus makes ...
The exterior design of the Lego Campus references the toymaker's products with a Lego brick-like facade
The exterior design of the Lego Campus references the toymaker's products with a Lego brick-like facade
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The exterior design of the Lego Campus references the toymaker's products with a Lego brick-like facade
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The exterior design of the Lego Campus references the toymaker's products with a Lego brick-like facade
The Lego Campus is located in Billund, Denmark, near BIG's Lego House
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The Lego Campus is located in Billund, Denmark, near BIG's Lego House
Drone shot showing the overall form of the Lego Campus during construction
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Drone shot showing the overall form of the Lego Campus during construction
The Lego Campus' interior is arranged around a large naturally lit atrium that has oversized Lego bricks hanging down from the ceiling
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The Lego Campus' interior is arranged around a large naturally lit atrium that has oversized Lego bricks hanging down from the ceiling
The Lego Campus features a "People's House" that provides generous staff amenities, including leisure facilities
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The Lego Campus features a "People's House" that provides generous staff amenities, including leisure facilities
The Lego Campus' decor embraces Lego's history and includes several notable figures and models
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The Lego Campus' decor embraces Lego's history and includes several notable figures and models
Much of the Lego Campus' interior is given over to open plan office space
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Much of the Lego Campus' interior is given over to open plan office space
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C.F. Møller Architects recently completed work on a new Lego Campus office in Billund, Denmark, that boasts impressive sustainability features. Though understandably not as whimsical as BIG's tourist-friendly Lego House nearby, the building's design also references the toymaker's products with some well-placed touches, including a facade that incorporates what look like oversized Lego bricks.

The Lego Campus was originally unveiled back in 2015 and is a large project, measuring 52,000 sq m (roughly 560,000 sq ft). It serves as workplace for a total of 2,000 employees and is surrounded by public park space. As well as its Lego brick facade, the exterior also recalls Lego's products with two large brick-like meeting spaces on the building's rooftop. Elsewhere are several green roof sections, some of which are used to a greenhouse and a mini-golf course.

Inside, the Lego Campus is arranged around an impressive central atrium that's filled with daylight thanks to a series of skylights. The space also hosts oversized Lego bricks hanging down from the ceiling. The decor throughout the building is bright and colorful, and highlights notable products with several large models and figures. Much of the available floorspace is taken up by open plan office space on the upper floors, however down on the ground floor lies remarkably generous amenities for staff and their families, including a sports hall, event spaces, restaurants, a cinema, health clinic, park area and hotel accommodation.

The Lego Campus' interior is arranged around a large naturally lit atrium that has oversized Lego bricks hanging down from the ceiling
The Lego Campus' interior is arranged around a large naturally lit atrium that has oversized Lego bricks hanging down from the ceiling

The Lego Campus has received the LEED Gold green building standard for its sustainable design. All outdoor furniture was created by recycling a total of 5,000 kg (roughly 11,000 lb) of Lego waste. According to CF Møller Architects, a gypsum fiberboard used during construction reduced CO2 emissions considerably. Additionally, 1,000 tons of construction waste was recycled during the build process. Rainwater collection systems are used to irrigate the greenery and the campus' parking garage is adorned with 4,150 solar panels, which produce over a million kWh annually.

"It's a great moment to see our new Campus officially open after many years of planning and construction," said Niels B. Christiansen, CEO of the Lego Group. "Many colleagues have contributed to shaping a workspace that reflects our values and instills a sense of fun not just for our employees in Billund, but for all our Lego teams across the world who regularly visit. Our mission is to inspire children so it's important we provide a vibrant, playful workplace that enables employees to deliver inspiring experiences for kids."

Source: CF Møller Architects

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ColinPearson
Looks great however sustainability isn't just some recycling! Good sustainability includes reducing energy and material use. That factor seems to have been entirely overlooked in the atrium. Reduction is something architects seem to overlook. Even the green building awards don't really look at want is needed. Instead they look at what is wanted. Could do better!