Architecture

Manhattan skyscraper recalls New York City's golden age

Manhattan skyscraper recalls N...
Rose Hill rises to a relatively modest height of 194.8 m (639 ft) and includes a total of 45 floors
Rose Hill rises to a relatively modest height of 194.8 m (639 ft) and includes a total of 45 floors
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Rose Hill rises to a relatively modest height of 194.8 m (639 ft) and includes a total of 45 floors
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Rose Hill rises to a relatively modest height of 194.8 m (639 ft) and includes a total of 45 floors
Rose Hill's eye-catching facade is made up of glass, as well as bronze-toned metal panels with vertical chevron patterning
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Rose Hill's eye-catching facade is made up of glass, as well as bronze-toned metal panels with vertical chevron patterning
Rose Hill's amenities include a private dining room, outdoor BBQ area, multiple indoor and outdoor common areas, and a games room
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Rose Hill's amenities include a private dining room, outdoor BBQ area, multiple indoor and outdoor common areas, and a games room
Rose Hill's prices start at $1.525 million for the smallest studio apartments, rising up to $20 million for a penthouse suite
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Rose Hill's prices start at $1.525 million for the smallest studio apartments, rising up to $20 million for a penthouse suite
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You could be forgiven for assuming that the recently completed Rose Hill skyscraper in Manhattan was built around the same time as the Empire State Building or Chrysler Building – and that's very much by design. Much like One Vanderbilt, the residential skyscraper was influenced by New York City's classic Art Deco towers and takes its place well among them.

Designed by CetraRuddy and developed by the Rockefeller Group, Rose Hill rises to a relatively modest height of 194.8 m (639 ft), which would be considered quite tall in London or Paris, but doesn't crack the top-100 tallest buildings in skyscraper-packed NYC.

Its eye-catching facade is made up of glass and bronze-toned metal panels with vertical chevron patterning, and it's topped by a "crown" that's illuminated by 300 ft (91 m) of LED lighting.

"We are absolutely thrilled to mark the completion of Rose Hill with the dramatic lighting of its sculpted crown," says John Cetra, FAIA, Founding Principal of CetraRuddy. "Our design for the building takes its cues from skyscrapers that served as beacons along the skyline of 20th-century New York. Rose Hill serves as a similar beacon of a new era, offering an inspired model for contemporary urban architecture. The decorative lighting accentuates the tower's base at street level and culminates in a majestic illuminated crown at the top."

Rose Hill's amenities include a private dining room, outdoor BBQ area, multiple indoor and outdoor common areas, and a games room
Rose Hill's amenities include a private dining room, outdoor BBQ area, multiple indoor and outdoor common areas, and a games room

The interior of the building consists of 45 floors and just 121 luxury homes. These range in size from studio apartments to spacious four-bedroom residences and boast high ceilings, generous glazing, custom-designed cabinetry and marble bathrooms. The homes also come in a different layouts and offer flexible options like the addition of a home-office, gym, library and nursery.

Amenities in the building include a private members-only dining room, an outdoor BBQ area, multiple indoor and outdoor common areas, an indoor pool and a sauna, as well as a salon especially for pampered pets.

Though it features old school styling, Rose Hill definitely has a modern approach to pricing. The smallest studio apartments available start at US$1.525 million, while a penthouse suite will cost you a cool $20 million. Still, this is actually relatively affordable compared to the incredibly expensive Central Park Tower elsewhere in Manhattan, which fetches over $100 million for a penthouse.

Sources: Rockefeller Group, Rose Hill

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1 comment
1 comment
ljaques
The exterior architects had couth. The interior designers, not at all. Read "The Not So Big House" by Sarah Susanka for a sane architect's design clarity.