Architecture

Greenery-covered building will feature 400,000 plants on its facade

Greenery-covered building will...
Should all go well and planning permission indeed be received, Citicape House is due to be completed in 2024
Assuming all goes to plan, Citicape House is due to be completed in 2024
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Citicape House will be located i
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Citicape House will be located in the City of London
A street-level view of Citicape House
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Citicape House will include a 382 room five star hotel, as well as workspaces, meetings and events spaces, a bar, and a restaurant
Should all go well and planning permission indeed be received, Citicape House is due to be completed in 2024
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Assuming all goes to plan, Citicape House is due to be completed in 2024

A remarkable new greenery-covered project has been submitted for planning permission in the City of London. Assuming it gets the thumbs-up, the Citicape House mixed-use hotel will integrate some 400,000 plants into its facade.

Citicape House is due for completion in 2024, and the 11-story building will be defined by its greenery-covered exterior, which architect Sheppard Robson says will be Europe's largest living wall.

"By integrating 40,000 square feet [3,716 sq m] of living wall within the facade, the building is projected to annually capture over eight tonnes [8.96 US tons] of carbon, produce six tonnes [6.72 tons] of oxygen, and lower the local temperature by three to five degrees Celsius," says Sheppard Robson's press release.

We've reached out to the firm for more information on how it arrived at these impressive figures, and will update the story when we hear back.

A street-level view of Citicape House
Citicape House will include a 382 room five star hotel, as well as workspaces, meetings and events spaces, a bar, and a restaurant

The interior of Citicape House will consist of a 382-room five-star hotel, workspaces, meetings and events spaces. Additionally, there will be a sky bar on the 10th floor, and a restaurant elsewhere in the building. The development will also include a rooftop terrace open to the public, that offers views of the nearby St. Paul’s Cathedral.

Citicape House is part of a recent worldwide boom in greenery-covered architecture, which has included Italy's Bosco Verticale, Singapore's Kampung Admiralty, and the Netherlands' Green Villa, to name just a few examples.

Source: Sheppard Robson

1 comment
buzzclick
"projected to annually capture over eight tonnes [8.96 US tons] of carbon, produce six tonnes [6.72 tons] of oxygen, and lower the local temperature by three to five degrees" That's quite ambitious. I have absolutely no problems in adding greenery to the street landscape, but projects such as this usually need high maintenance and tend to look like crap in just a few years. City folks often want things like this done for them.