Architecture

Seeds sown for hybrid timber tower in Berlin

Seeds sown for hybrid timber t...
WoHo will reach a height of 98 m (321 ft) and feature 29 floors
WoHo will reach a height of 98 m (321 ft) and have 29 floors
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Assuming all goes to plan, WoHo is expected to be completed in 2026
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Assuming all goes to plan, WoHo is expected to be completed in 2026
WoHo's total floorspace of 18,000 sq m (roughly 193,000 sq ft) will be mostly given over to residential space, but it will also contain some commercial space on the lower floors
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WoHo's total floorspace of 18,000 sq m (roughly 193,000 sq ft) will be mostly given over to residential space, but it will also contain some commercial space on the lower floors
WoHo's interior decor highlights the natural beauty of the wood and also looks like it will be light-filled thanks to generous glazing
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WoHo's interior decor highlights the natural beauty of the wood and also looks like it will be light-filled thanks to generous glazing
WoHo's facade will integrate significant greenery, plus the tower will contain rooftop gardens
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WoHo's facade will integrate significant greenery, plus the tower will contain rooftop gardens
WoHo will reach a height of 98 m (321 ft) and feature 29 floors
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WoHo will reach a height of 98 m (321 ft) and have 29 floors
View gallery - 5 images

The tall timber construction boom continues with a new mixed-use residential tower slated for Berlin, Germany. Designed by Oslo's Mad arkitekter, the project will integrate greenery and feature a hybrid wood and concrete structure that will allow it to reach a considerable height of 98 m (321 ft).

WoHo is slated for Berlin's Kreuzberg district and will have 29 floors and a total floorspace of 18,000 sq m (roughly 193,000 sq ft), including adjacent low-rise buildings that are part of the project. Most of the available space will be taken up by residential apartments, with some social housing and some flexible spaces meant to be adaptable to community needs. The lower floors will host bakers, cafés, workshops, daycare, and more. There will also be a publicly accessible rooftop garden on the main tower's uppermost floor that will contain a bar and sauna, plus some additional outdoor terrace areas.

As with other wooden tower projects we've covered, Mad arkitekter's design aims to accentuate the natural beauty of the wood, both on the exterior and interior, with the greenery on the facade helping to enliven it. The interior decor looks simple and pleasant and should be relatively light-filled thanks to generous glazing too.

Structurally, the project will consist of a concrete core and basement, while the columns, beams, floor slabs, and other structural elements will be made from cross-laminated timber. The additional structural stability gained from the concrete helps it reach the 98 m (321 ft) height, which exceeds the current world's tallest all-timber tower, Mjøstårnet, which reaches 85.4 m (240 ft).

WoHo's interior decor highlights the natural beauty of the wood and also looks like it will be light-filled thanks to generous glazing
WoHo's interior decor highlights the natural beauty of the wood and also looks like it will be light-filled thanks to generous glazing

WoHo was recently chosen as the winner of an international architecture competition and is currently going through the planning process. Assuming all goes well, Mad arkitekter hopes it will be completed by 2026. According to Bloomberg's CityLab, the budget comes to €90 million (roughly US$110 million).

Tall timber construction is one of the fastest-moving and most exciting areas of architectural innovation at the moment. Some other projects that take a similar approach of combining concrete and timber include the Tree House and Atlassian HQ.

Source: Mad arkitekter

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1 comment
1 comment
buzzclick
I'm all for using wood in construction, but having a wood finish in the exterior and interiors is very impractical. Whether it's finished with a coating (sealer, polyurethane, etc) or not, in 5-10 years it will begin to look unflattering. Normal day to day use and UV light will make it look aged and probably in need of a refinishing or a paint job. As for the exterior foliage, yes a green roof is a wonderful idea, but all those flower boxes in the windows may look unkempt and sorry if the tenants or management don't provide the required maintenance...but hey, everybody loves green so it's gotta be good, right?