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Bonbowl is a high-tech take on the humble hotplate

Bonbowl is a high-tech take on...
The Bonbowl Cooktop and Bowl is priced at US$149
The Bonbowl Cooktop and Bowl is priced at US$149
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Bonbowl buyers can choose between an uncoated or non-stick bowl
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Bonbowl buyers can choose between an uncoated or non-stick bowl
The Bonbowl Cooktop and Bowl is priced at US$149
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The Bonbowl Cooktop and Bowl is priced at US$149
Cooking times and temperatures are input via the Bonbowl's tempered glass touch-sensitive interface
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Cooking times and temperatures are input via the Bonbowl's tempered glass touch-sensitive interface
View gallery - 3 images

For decades, people without access to kitchens (such as college students) have cooked meals on portable electric hotplates. The Bonbowl gives that concept a modern makeover, by incorporating faster, more efficient induction heating technology.

Putting it very basically, induction heating utilizes a rapidly alternating magnetic field to produce eddy currents, which in turn generate heat in an electrically conductive object such as a steel pot or pan. Among its attributes are the facts that it generates heat much quicker than gas or electric burners, it uses less power, plus the heat is only generated within the conductive object – the cooking surface itself remains cool to the touch.

While full-size ovens with induction heating cooktops have been around for some time now, in 2019 entrepreneur Mike Kobida set out to apply the technology to a portable system. Two years later, the Bonbowl is the result.

Bonbowl buyers can choose between an uncoated or non-stick bowl
Bonbowl buyers can choose between an uncoated or non-stick bowl

The device comes with a dishwasher-safe, double-walled, single-serving stainless steel bowl, which meals are both cooked in and eaten out of. Users can either figure things out for themselves, or follow one of a number of included recipes – these reportedly incorporate easily-available ingredients, and can be cooked in 15 minutes or less.

Cooking times and temperatures are input via a tempered glass touch-sensitive interface. Temperature sensors within the device proceed to detect when the bowl has reached the target temperature, and then keep it there. The bowl's double-walled design keeps its outside from getting too hot, so users can pick it up without burning their hands.

Should you be interested, the Bonbowl is available now with either an uncoated or non-stick bowl, priced at US$149. It's demonstrated in the video below.

Source: Bonbowl

Bonbowl - Induction Cooktop to Cook for One

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6 comments
6 comments
Trylon
I'm a fan of induction cooking, but I don't think you can say that it heats faster than gas. At best, they're comparable in speed, both being a lot faster than conventional electric stoves. A huge advantage is that induction cookers and cooktops have a lot more sensors and controls so they can cook by pot temperature or by time, things gas can't do. They can also shut themselves down if a pot boils dry or overheats for any other reason, making them much safer than gas if you must leave cooking unattended. Likewise safer without an open flame that can cause a fire and with no CO2 combustion end-product.
Username
I've had an induction single for 5 years. How is this a story?
see3d
Nothing new about a single countertop induction heater. I have had a $50 one for many years. The story here is really about the cook and eat insulated bowl with temperature sensing.
Signguy
Yeah Username, you can buy one for less than $50. so why waste money for a bowl?
Peter Herford
Where are the editors. Portable induction has been around for decades. Good units can be bought for half of this "bonbowl" that smells of badly researched marketing.
ljaques
$150? Is it that much better than a $28 two-burner from Wally World?