Around The Home

Nudge electronic tag tech designed to reduce food wastage

Nudge electronic tag tech desi...
Placed on food items, the Nudge Tags illuminate in different colors to indicate how much time is left before the food spoils
Placed on food items, the Nudge Tags illuminate in different colors to indicate how much time is left before the food spoils
View 2 Images
Placed on food items, the Nudge Tags illuminate in different colors to indicate how much time is left before the food spoils
1/2
Placed on food items, the Nudge Tags illuminate in different colors to indicate how much time is left before the food spoils
The Puck communicates with the Tags via Bluetooth, and with the app via Wi-Fi
2/2
The Puck communicates with the Tags via Bluetooth, and with the app via Wi-Fi

Pretty much everyone has had the experience of finding forgotten food in the fridge that spoiled before any of it was eaten. The Nudge Tag system is designed to keep that from happening, via color-changing electronic dongles.

Developed by Virginia-based startup Tugiba, the Nudge Tag system consists of two main parts: a cloud-connected Puck device that's magnetically mounted on the front of the refrigerator door, and multiple Tags that are hung on or clipped onto foods.

When the user is putting a food item in the fridge for the first time, they start by twisting a dial on the Puck – doing so advances a digital display, which indicates how many days are left before that item will expire (based on its use-by date, etc). They then press a Bluetooth pairing button on one of the Tags, which is held near the Puck. This transfers the dialed-in data to the Tag.

Finally, that Tag is attached to the food item, which is placed inside the refrigerator. Every time the fridge door is subsequently opened, the Puck detects the movement, and responds by wirelessly triggering all of the currently active Tags to illuminate in one of three colors – green means there's plenty of time left to consume the food, yellow means it should be used soon, and red means that it has expired.

The Puck communicates with the Tags via Bluetooth, and with the app via Wi-Fi
The Puck communicates with the Tags via Bluetooth, and with the app via Wi-Fi

Additionally, both the Puck's LCD touchscreen and an accompanying app display the number of Tags that are currently assigned to foods, along with the color status of each Tag. The Puck's lithium-polymer battery should reportedly be good for about 15 days per charge, while each Tag's replaceable coin cell battery ought to last for up to one year.

Should you be interested, the Nudge Tag system is presently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. Assuming it reaches production, a pledge of US$109 will get you a package consisting of one Puck and six Tags, with $148 required for a one-Puck/12-Tag kit. Voice-activated Tags may later be offered as a stretch goal.

You can see the system in use, in the video below.

Nudge Tags: Prevent Food Wastage

Sources: Kickstarter, Nudge

2 comments
2 comments
TechGazer
The people who are oblivious to food rotting in their fridges will probably ignore coloured tags too, especially if the item is hidden behind something else. I think this is one of those gadgets that will be given as gifts, or bought and set up with great expectations, and then packed away somewhere until it finally gets thrown out.
Spud Murphy
And all destined to be e-waste in a year or two at most. All these ideas are great in theory, but humans being what they are, they get tired of the extra steps required and eventually go back to old habits, throwing stuff like this in a drawer somewhere for the batteries to completely discharge and fail...