Automotive

Aston Martin and Bowmore create $65,000 per bottle whisky

Aston Martin and Bowmore creat...
The iconic Bowmore whisky and the legendary Aston Martin DB5 are linked by the bottle of single malt whisky incorporating an Aston Martin DB5 piston
The iconic Bowmore whisky and the legendary Aston Martin DB5 are linked by the bottle of single malt whisky incorporating an Aston Martin DB5 piston
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Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges.
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Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges.
The iconic Bowmore whisky and the legendary Aston Martin DB5 are linked by the bottle of single malt whisky incorporating an Aston Martin DB5 piston
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The iconic Bowmore whisky and the legendary Aston Martin DB5 are linked by the bottle of single malt whisky incorporating an Aston Martin DB5 piston
The highlights of Richard Gooding's 3,900 bottle ‘Perfect Collection’ were seen as these bottle by one of the foremost whisky authorities in the world: Just 24 bottles of Springbank 1919 vintage were bottled at the distillery in 1970. It has held the world record price for a bottle of whisky at least once.; Black Bowmore 1964; Macallan 1926 60-year-old Valerio Adami three bottles of this whisky have sold for more than $1.1 million each; Balvenie 50 Years Old - bottles regularly sell for $40,000 each; Macallan 1926 60-year-old Fine & Rare - the world record holder for whisky price - the last one to sell at auction fetched $1,860,307 (£1,452,000)
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The highlights of Richard Gooding's 3,900 bottle ‘Perfect Collection’ were seen as these bottle by one of the foremost whisky authorities in the world: Just 24 bottles of Springbank 1919 vintage were bottled at the distillery in 1970. It has held the world record price for a bottle of whisky at least once.; Black Bowmore 1964; Macallan 1926 60-year-old Valerio Adami three bottles of this whisky have sold for more than $1.1 million each; Balvenie 50 Years Old - bottles regularly sell for $40,000 each; Macallan 1926 60-year-old Fine & Rare - the world record holder for whisky price - the last one to sell at auction fetched $1,860,307 (£1,452,000)
The impact of the 1964 James Bond feature film Goldfinger cannot be overstated. One third of a century after the movie's debut, the lethal bowler hat of with internal metal 'frizbee' used by one of the movie's main arch-villains, Oddjob, sold for $104,380 at a Chritie's auction in 1998.
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The impact of the 1964 James Bond feature film Goldfinger cannot be overstated. One third of a century after the movie's debut, the lethal bowler hat of with internal metal 'frizbee' used by one of the movie's main arch-villains, Oddjob, sold for $104,380 at a Chritie's auction in 1998.
Auric Goldfinger and his bowler-hatchetman Oddjob as pictured in the 1964 movie Goldfinger. Goldfinger’s 1937 Rolls-Royce Phantom III was sold in June 1986 at a Sotheby’s auction in New York for US$121,000. It's interesting to note that on the same day this car sold for US$121,000, the Bond Aston Martin DB5 from the film sold for US$275,000 at the same auction. Thirty-four years later, in 2010, the Aston Martin sold for for £2,912,000 (US$4,595,998), so you can see the capital appreciation available in a wisely chosen asset from such a high-profile film.
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Auric Goldfinger and his bowler-hatchetman Oddjob as pictured in the 1964 movie Goldfinger. Goldfinger’s 1937 Rolls-Royce Phantom III was sold in June 1986 at a Sotheby’s auction in New York for US$121,000. It's interesting to note that on the same day this car sold for US$121,000, the Bond Aston Martin DB5 from the film sold for US$275,000 at the same auction. Thirty-four years later, in 2010, the Aston Martin sold for for £2,912,000 (US$4,595,998), so you can see the capital appreciation available in a wisely chosen asset from such a high-profile film.
Possibly the most famous automobile in the world during the 1960s when Ian Fleming's books became consecutive movie blockbusters, the highly-modified 1964 model Aston Martin DB5 was presented in the movie Goldfinger by gadgetmeister Q (Desmond Llewelyn) to Bond (Sean Connery) complete with .30 calibre Browning machine guns behind the front indicators, retractable tire slashers, a retractable rear bullet proof screen, a radio telephone concealed in the door, a radar scanner with a tracking screen in the cockpit, a passenger ejector seat, an oil slick and smoke screen generator and revolving number plates.
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Possibly the most famous automobile in the world during the 1960s when Ian Fleming's books became consecutive movie blockbusters, the highly-modified 1964 model Aston Martin DB5 was presented in the movie Goldfinger by gadgetmeister Q (Desmond Llewelyn) to Bond (Sean Connery) complete with .30 calibre Browning machine guns behind the front indicators, retractable tire slashers, a retractable rear bullet proof screen, a radio telephone concealed in the door, a radar scanner with a tracking screen in the cockpit, a passenger ejector seat, an oil slick and smoke screen generator and revolving number plates.
When Goldfinger hit cinemas in 1964, it was a smash hit, and the weaponized Aston Martin DB5 immediately became the most famous car in the world, Sean Connery became the hearthrob of a generation and a toy replica of the DB5 by Corgi Toys became the biggest selling toy of 1964.
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When Goldfinger hit cinemas in 1964, it was a smash hit, and the weaponized Aston Martin DB5 immediately became the most famous car in the world, Sean Connery became the hearthrob of a generation and a toy replica of the DB5 by Corgi Toys became the biggest selling toy of 1964.
The 1964 spy film 'Goldfinger' was the third film in the James Bond film franchise after 'From Russia with Love' and 'Dr. No', and the prior success of those films saw 'Goldfinger'’s budget swell to $3 million (more than the budget of both previous films combined). It paid off, as 'Goldfinger' was the first real Bond blockbuster and the $3 million production costs were recouped in the first two weeks at the box office.
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The 1964 spy film 'Goldfinger' was the third film in the James Bond film franchise after 'From Russia with Love' and 'Dr. No', and the prior success of those films saw 'Goldfinger'’s budget swell to $3 million (more than the budget of both previous films combined). It paid off, as 'Goldfinger' was the first real Bond blockbuster and the $3 million production costs were recouped in the first two weeks at the box office.
There have been three primary bottlings of Black Bowmore1964. The first edition saw 2000 bottles produced in 1993. The second edition saw another 2000 bottles produced in 1994 and the final edition saw 1812 bottles produced in 1995. All bottlings saw each bottle given its own wooden presentation case. The three bottles pictured are each from one of those bottlings, being bottle number 904 of 2000 from the first edition, bottle number 363 of 2000 from the second edition, and bottle number 885 of 1812. The three bottles of Black Bowmore 1964 sold as one lot at a Bonhams auction on 12 December 2018 for GBP£93,750 (US$118,666).
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There have been three primary bottlings of Black Bowmore1964. The first edition saw 2000 bottles produced in 1993. The second edition saw another 2000 bottles produced in 1994 and the final edition saw 1812 bottles produced in 1995. All bottlings saw each bottle given its own wooden presentation case. The three bottles pictured are each from one of those bottlings, being bottle number 904 of 2000 from the first edition, bottle number 363 of 2000 from the second edition, and bottle number 885 of 1812. The three bottles of Black Bowmore 1964 sold as one lot at a Bonhams auction on 12 December 2018 for GBP£93,750 (US$118,666).
Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
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Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
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Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
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Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
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Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
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Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
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Black Bowmore DB5 1964 is presented in a handmade calfskin presentation box; itself a work of art, with bespoke nickel-plated brass latch and hinges. The presentation box also contains a booklet explaining the heritage of the brand collaboration from both sides.
The Worshipful Company of Distillers was founded in 1638 when King Charles I gave Sir Theodore de Mayerne a Royal Charter to regulate the distilling trade in the Cities of London and Westminster. Having survived the Great Fire of London, the Black Plague and two World Wars, the organisation's main role these days is raising funds for charity. In October, 2013, the Worshipful Company of Distillers hosted a charity auction with Christie's David Elswood wielding the auction hammer, Bowmore’s Brian Morrison in his customary role as the Master of the Company, and Sir Jackie Stewart at hand to keep the stories coming. The highlight of the evening was this bottle of Bowmore drawn from the same cask as the Black Bowmore DB5 that was packaged specifically for this auction. The whisky was distilled on November 5, 1964 and filled into a 1st Fill Oloroso Sherry Butt where it matured for 48 years. The bottle is of hand blown high quality cosmetic glass produced by Glasstorm in Tain, the box is handmade from selected Scottish Oak and produced by Peter Toaig cabinetmakers in Cumbria, and the solid silver neck wrap is handcrafted by Hamilton & Inches of Edinburgh. In an auction where the entire audience was comprised of the most knowledgeable whisky professionals and master distillers in the world, this bottle of Bowmore fetched £61,000 ($93,235) to take the world record for a standard-sized bottle of whisky.
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The Worshipful Company of Distillers was founded in 1638 when King Charles I gave Sir Theodore de Mayerne a Royal Charter to regulate the distilling trade in the Cities of London and Westminster. Having survived the Great Fire of London, the Black Plague and two World Wars, the organisation's main role these days is raising funds for charity. In October, 2013, the Worshipful Company of Distillers hosted a charity auction with Christie's David Elswood wielding the auction hammer, Bowmore’s Brian Morrison in his customary role as the Master of the Company, and Sir Jackie Stewart at hand to keep the stories coming. The highlight of the evening was this bottle of Bowmore drawn from the same cask as the Black Bowmore DB5 that was packaged specifically for this auction. The whisky was distilled on November 5, 1964 and filled into a 1st Fill Oloroso Sherry Butt where it matured for 48 years. The bottle is of hand blown high quality cosmetic glass produced by Glasstorm in Tain, the box is handmade from selected Scottish Oak and produced by Peter Toaig cabinetmakers in Cumbria, and the solid silver neck wrap is handcrafted by Hamilton & Inches of Edinburgh. In an auction where the entire audience was comprised of the most knowledgeable whisky professionals and master distillers in the world, this bottle of Bowmore fetched £61,000 ($93,235) to take the world record for a standard-sized bottle of whisky.
Richard Gooding died at 67 years of age in 2019, having been the third-generation owner of Pepsi Cola Bottling Company which he sold in 1988. Gooding’s subsequent passion was his whisky collection which he spent two decades curating, regularly flying from his home in America to Scotland in his private jet. His aim was to have the “perfect collection” with representative bottles from every Scottish Distillery and he visited most of the distilleries, tasting tens of thousands of whiskies and collecting 3900 of the finest whiskies in the world, including several bottles worth more than $1,000,000 each.
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Richard Gooding died at 67 years of age in 2019, having been the third-generation owner of Pepsi Cola Bottling Company which he sold in 1988. Gooding’s subsequent passion was his whisky collection which he spent two decades curating, regularly flying from his home in America to Scotland in his private jet. His aim was to have the “perfect collection” with representative bottles from every Scottish Distillery and he visited most of the distilleries, tasting tens of thousands of whiskies and collecting 3900 of the finest whiskies in the world, including several bottles worth more than $1,000,000 each.
The most plentiful single whisky in Richard Gooding'S "Perfect Collection" was the Black Bowmore 64.
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The most plentiful single whisky in Richard Gooding'S "Perfect Collection" was the Black Bowmore 64.
A small glimpse of what one of the world's foremost whisky collections looks like. This collection was assembled over two decades by Richard Gooding. The first half of Mr Gooding's collection has already been auctioned and the second half is expected to be auctioned before the end of 2020
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A small glimpse of what one of the world's foremost whisky collections looks like. This collection was assembled over two decades by Richard Gooding. The first half of Mr Gooding's collection has already been auctioned and the second half is expected to be auctioned before the end of 2020
View gallery - 19 images
Richard Gooding died at 67 years of age in 2019, having been the third-generation owner of Pepsi Cola Bottling Company which he sold in 1988. Gooding’s subsequent passion was his whisky collection which he spent two decades curating, regularly flying from his home in America to Scotland in his private jet. His aim was to have the “perfect collection” with representative bottles from every Scottish Distillery and he visited most of the distilleries, tasting tens of thousands of whiskies and collecting 3900 of the finest whiskies in the world, including several bottles worth more than $1,000,000 each.
Richard Gooding died at 67 years of age in 2019, having been the third-generation owner of Pepsi Cola Bottling Company which he sold in 1988. Gooding’s subsequent passion was his whisky collection which he spent two decades curating, regularly flying from his home in America to Scotland in his private jet. His aim was to have the “perfect collection” with representative bottles from every Scottish Distillery and he visited most of the distilleries, tasting tens of thousands of whiskies and collecting 3900 of the finest whiskies in the world, including several bottles worth more than $1,000,000 each.

Aston Martin and Bowmore Whisky have linked brands to create a limited edition bottling to be known as Black Bowmore DB5 1964 whisky. Each Black Bowmore DB5 bottle incorporates an Aston Martin DB5 piston, while the bottle contains 700 ml of Black Bowmore 1964 single malt, one of the rarest and most sought-after single malt whiskies ever created.

Just 25 bottles of Black Bowmore DB5 1964 will be available later this year at £50,000 (US$65,590) per bottle.

As an investment, even at the $65,590 buy price, these bottles will prove to be much better than gold. In addition to already being one of the world’s most revered whiskies, Black Bowmore DB5 1964 will become famous because of the novelty, rarity and media coverage it is currently generating.

What's more, it is likely that even though this news is only a few days old, all of those bottles are already spoken for and not one of them will ever be opened, unless it is for corporate brand defining purposes, the main motivation behind the exercise in the first place.

As we pointed out a few weeks back in an article entitled Rare whisky is shaping as the perfect hedge in an economic downturn, bottles at the very pinnacle of old and rare whisky stopped being a drink and turned into an alternative asset class on or shortly after May 24, 2005.

That was the date that a customer at the Pennyhill Park Hotel in England paid £32,000 ($58,502) for a bottle of Dalmore 62 Year Old, setting a world record price for a bottle of whisky … and then drank the bottle in one sitting, with the help of a few friends.

Only 12 bottles of Dalmore 62 Year Old were ever produced, and one already held the world record (£25,878, which calculates to US$40,602, paid at McTear’s Auctions in Glasgow in December 2002) when that bottle was purchased and consumed at the Pennyhill Park Hotel.

It was the last time that a bottle of world record whisky was consumed, and it will NEVER happen again, largely because the world record for a bottle of whisky skyrocketed shortly thereafter and has now reached £1,452,000 ($1,860,307).

As we pointed out in that article, a standard 30 ml shot from the world record bottle would now cost £62,229 ($79,727), or nearly double the price that our hedonistic Pennyhill hero paid for the entire bottle.

The partnership between Aston Martin and Bowmore is a fascinating one and there are great similarities between the brand attributes. Apparently there will be many "more collaborative projects and products over the coming months and years, ranging from exceptional experiences to design-led product initiatives with the goal of offering fans of the brands, across a broad spectrum, the opportunities to connect with the partnership."

The 1964 spy film 'Goldfinger' was the third film in the James Bond film franchise after 'From Russia with Love' and 'Dr. No', and the prior success of those films saw 'Goldfinger'’s budget swell to $3 million (more than the budget of both previous films combined). It paid off, as 'Goldfinger' was the first real Bond blockbuster and the $3 million production costs were recouped in the first two weeks at the box office.
The 1964 spy film 'Goldfinger' was the third film in the James Bond film franchise after 'From Russia with Love' and 'Dr. No', and the prior success of those films saw 'Goldfinger'’s budget swell to $3 million (more than the budget of both previous films combined). It paid off, as 'Goldfinger' was the first real Bond blockbuster and the $3 million production costs were recouped in the first two weeks at the box office.

The coincidence of the 1964 date might not be obvious to the casual observer who is not both a whisky connoisseur and old enough to remember the fuss that secret agent James Bond caused in the same year when the feature film Goldfinger was released.

Possibly the most famous automobile in the world during the 1960s when Ian Fleming's books became consecutive movie blockbusters, the highly-modified 1964 model Aston Martin DB5 was presented in the movie Goldfinger by gadgetmeister Q (Desmond Llewelyn) to Bond (Sean Connery) complete with .30 calibre Browning machine guns behind the front indicators, retractable tire slashers, a retractable rear bullet proof screen, a radio telephone concealed in the door, a radar scanner with a tracking screen in the cockpit, a passenger ejector seat, an oil slick and smoke screen generator and revolving number plates.
Possibly the most famous automobile in the world during the 1960s when Ian Fleming's books became consecutive movie blockbusters, the highly-modified 1964 model Aston Martin DB5 was presented in the movie Goldfinger by gadgetmeister Q (Desmond Llewelyn) to Bond (Sean Connery) complete with .30 calibre Browning machine guns behind the front indicators, retractable tire slashers, a retractable rear bullet proof screen, a radio telephone concealed in the door, a radar scanner with a tracking screen in the cockpit, a passenger ejector seat, an oil slick and smoke screen generator and revolving number plates.

The silver gadget-festooned Aston Martin DB5, driven by Sean Connery as James Bond in the film, caused a global sensation and immediately became the poster car for a generation of aspiring technophiles.

When Goldfinger hit cinemas in 1964, it was a smash hit, and the weaponized Aston Martin DB5 immediately became the most famous car in the world, Sean Connery became the hearthrob of a generation and a toy replica of the DB5 by Corgi Toys became the biggest selling toy of 1964.
When Goldfinger hit cinemas in 1964, it was a smash hit, and the weaponized Aston Martin DB5 immediately became the most famous car in the world, Sean Connery became the hearthrob of a generation and a toy replica of the DB5 by Corgi Toys became the biggest selling toy of 1964.

Coming hot on the heels of the Aston Martin DB4, DB4 GT and DB4 GT Zagato, which passed the torch of being the world's fastest road car at the time, the Aston Martin DB5 was included in filming before it was released to the media, and the film indelibly burned the Aston Martin DB5 into the global consciousness as a metaphor for sporting excellence. Just 1,059 DB5s were built in the day, and a further 25 continuation units were constructed this year. These days, they sell for more than $1.0 million apiece at auction.

1964 Bowmore: Best-of-breed

The 1964 Bowmore is held in similar high esteem in whisky circles as the DB5 is in automotive history. Bowmore is Islay’s oldest distillery and just as entrepreneur David Brown (who contributed the DB in DB5) picked up a respected name and made it a world-beater, Stanley P. Morrison purchased Bowmore distillery in 1963 and his early innovations proved decisive in taking the distillery's name to global prominence.

Bowmore’s “No. 1 Vaults” are among the oldest maturing warehouses in Scotland and they have certain qualities that aid in creating a special whisky. For starters, they are below sea-level, and the air is cold, damp and salt-laden, which is apparently ideal for whisky maturation.

Beyond investing in buying the distillery, Morrison also invested in the distillation technology, increasing the number of stills and installing gas-fired technology instead of the age-old coal-burning stills. It was one of the first major applications of gas-fired whisky distillation. The third and final change in the process was the use of maturation casks from the bodegas of Spain where they had previously held Oloroso Sherry.

It can't be a coincidence that The Macallan 1926 60-Years-Old that has subsequently demolished every world price record at auction was also matured in Oloroso Sherry casks from the same area of Spain.

Most Scotches are matured in casks made of American oak that have previously held bourbon, which imparts a golden color and inflections of vanilla, sweetness, caramel and creaminess.

The results of maturation in Oloroso casks (also made of American oak) means that Black Bowmore 1964 takes on a deeper reddish color with inflections of nuts and dark ripe fruits, and a richer more complex array of flavors.

Distilled on 5 November 1964, Black Bowmore 1964 introduced a new era of excellence for the Bowmore name, renewing the legend.

The Worshipful Company of Distillers was founded in 1638 when King Charles I gave Sir Theodore de Mayerne a Royal Charter to regulate the distilling trade in the Cities of London and Westminster. Having survived the Great Fire of London, the Black Plague and two World Wars, the organisation's main role these days is raising funds for charity. In October, 2013, the Worshipful Company of Distillers hosted a charity auction with Christie's David Elswood wielding the auction hammer, Bowmore’s Brian Morrison in his customary role as the Master of the Company, and Sir Jackie Stewart at hand to keep the stories coming. The highlight of the evening was this bottle of Bowmore drawn from the same cask as the Black Bowmore DB5 that was packaged specifically for this auction. The whisky was distilled on November 5, 1964 and filled into a 1st Fill Oloroso Sherry Butt where it matured for 48 years. The bottle is of hand blown high quality cosmetic glass produced by Glasstorm in Tain, the box is handmade from selected Scottish Oak and produced by Peter Toaig cabinetmakers in Cumbria, and the solid silver neck wrap is handcrafted by Hamilton & Inches of Edinburgh. In an auction where the entire audience was comprised of the most knowledgeable whisky professionals and master distillers in the world, this bottle of Bowmore fetched £61,000 ($93,235) to take the world record for a standard-sized bottle of whisky.
The Worshipful Company of Distillers was founded in 1638 when King Charles I gave Sir Theodore de Mayerne a Royal Charter to regulate the distilling trade in the Cities of London and Westminster. Having survived the Great Fire of London, the Black Plague and two World Wars, the organisation's main role these days is raising funds for charity. In October, 2013, the Worshipful Company of Distillers hosted a charity auction with Christie's David Elswood wielding the auction hammer, Bowmore’s Brian Morrison in his customary role as the Master of the Company, and Sir Jackie Stewart at hand to keep the stories coming. The highlight of the evening was this bottle of Bowmore drawn from the same cask as the Black Bowmore DB5 that was packaged specifically for this auction. The whisky was distilled on November 5, 1964 and filled into a 1st Fill Oloroso Sherry Butt where it matured for 48 years. The bottle is of hand blown high quality cosmetic glass produced by Glasstorm in Tain, the box is handmade from selected Scottish Oak and produced by Peter Toaig cabinetmakers in Cumbria, and the solid silver neck wrap is handcrafted by Hamilton & Inches of Edinburgh. In an auction where the entire audience was comprised of the most knowledgeable whisky professionals and master distillers in the world, this bottle of Bowmore fetched £61,000 ($93,235) to take the world record for a standard-sized bottle of whisky.

Apart from the world record above, it's worth considering the recent auction of "The Perfect Collection" that was assembled by the late Richard Gooding, which consisted of over 3,900 bottles of single malt Scotch whisky.

A small glimpse of what one of the world's foremost whisky collections looks like. This collection was assembled over two decades by Richard Gooding. The first half of Mr Gooding's collection has already been auctioned and the second half is expected to be auctioned before the end of 2020
A small glimpse of what one of the world's foremost whisky collections looks like. This collection was assembled over two decades by Richard Gooding. The first half of Mr Gooding's collection has already been auctioned and the second half is expected to be auctioned before the end of 2020
The highlights of Richard Gooding's 3,900 bottle ‘Perfect Collection’ were seen as these bottle by one of the foremost whisky authorities in the world: Just 24 bottles of Springbank 1919 vintage were bottled at the distillery in 1970. It has held the world record price for a bottle of whisky at least once.; Black Bowmore 1964; Macallan 1926 60-year-old Valerio Adami three bottles of this whisky have sold for more than $1.1 million each; Balvenie 50 Years Old - bottles regularly sell for $40,000 each; Macallan 1926 60-year-old Fine & Rare - the world record holder for whisky price - the last one to sell at auction fetched $1,860,307 (£1,452,000)
The highlights of Richard Gooding's 3,900 bottle ‘Perfect Collection’ were seen as these bottle by one of the foremost whisky authorities in the world: Just 24 bottles of Springbank 1919 vintage were bottled at the distillery in 1970. It has held the world record price for a bottle of whisky at least once.; Black Bowmore 1964; Macallan 1926 60-year-old Valerio Adami three bottles of this whisky have sold for more than $1.1 million each; Balvenie 50 Years Old - bottles regularly sell for $40,000 each; Macallan 1926 60-year-old Fine & Rare - the world record holder for whisky price - the last one to sell at auction fetched $1,860,307 (£1,452,000)
Richard Gooding died at 67 years of age in 2019, having been the third-generation owner of Pepsi Cola Bottling Company which he sold in 1988. Gooding’s subsequent passion was his whisky collection which he spent two decades curating, regularly flying from his home in America to Scotland in his private jet. His aim was to have the “perfect collection” with representative bottles from every Scottish Distillery and he visited most of the distilleries, tasting tens of thousands of whiskies and collecting 3900 of the finest whiskies in the world, including several bottles worth more than $1,000,000 each.
Richard Gooding died at 67 years of age in 2019, having been the third-generation owner of Pepsi Cola Bottling Company which he sold in 1988. Gooding’s subsequent passion was his whisky collection which he spent two decades curating, regularly flying from his home in America to Scotland in his private jet. His aim was to have the “perfect collection” with representative bottles from every Scottish Distillery and he visited most of the distilleries, tasting tens of thousands of whiskies and collecting 3900 of the finest whiskies in the world, including several bottles worth more than $1,000,000 each.
The most plentiful single whisky in Richard Gooding'S "Perfect Collection" was the Black Bowmore 64.
The most plentiful single whisky in Richard Gooding'S "Perfect Collection" was the Black Bowmore 64.

Gooding had virtually an unlimited amount of money to purchase his whiskies and had tasted everything worth tasting. The most plentiful whisky in his collection and his unabashed favorite whisky of all time: the Black Bowmore 64.

View gallery - 19 images
3 comments
buzzclick
As a long-time enthusiast of Aston Martin, and a dabbler of single malt, I don't know quite what to make of this, especially since Ian Fleming's original Bond drove a DB MkIII. At any rate, I don't think it matters in the end. People who spend so much money and give so much attention to whiskies and investments are not my cup of tea. Richard Gooding with all his wealth and 3,900 bottle collection lived to only 67. Alas, he wasn't here for a long time, but I hope he had a good time.
Nelson Hyde Chick
How stupid and rich does one need to be to waste that kind of money on a bottle of whiskey?!
Readout Noise
"His aim was to have the “perfect collection” with representative bottles from every Scottish Distillery and he visited most of the distilleries, tasting tens of thousands of whiskies and collecting 3900 of the finest whiskies in the world, including several bottles worth more than $1,000,000 each."

What a missed opportunity! He collected the wrong stuff. Irish whiskey beats Scottish whisky every time.