Automotive

Case unveils Project Zeus, an electric backhoe loader

Case unveils Project Zeus, an ...
Called Project Zeus, the backhoe is Case's first fully electric vehicle
Called Project Zeus, the backhoe is Case's first fully electric vehicle
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Called Project Zeus, the backhoe is Case's first fully electric vehicle
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Called Project Zeus, the backhoe is Case's first fully electric vehicle
In addition to the environmental benefits, Case says that its electric backhoe could save operators as much as 90 percent on service and maintenance costs
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In addition to the environmental benefits, Case says that its electric backhoe could save operators as much as 90 percent on service and maintenance costs

While the electrification of cars and buses generate a lot of the headlines around these parts, there are plenty of niche vehicles that are also being steered away from fossil fuels. Offering one example is construction equipment company Case, who has introduced what it bills as the industry's first fully electric backhoe loader.

Called Project Zeus, or the 580 EV, the backhoe is Case's first fully electric vehicle and is powered by a 480-V and 90 kWh lithium battery. That's a far cry from the 600- kWh monster in the world's biggest electric vehicle, but Case says each battery charge will provide enough juice for a typical eight-hour workday, while offering similar performance to a diesel-powered backhoe due to the way power is distributed to the drivetrain and hydraulic motors.

In addition to the environmental benefits, Case says that its electric backhoe could save operators as much as 90 percent on service and maintenance costs, due to the elimination of the complex components in diesel-powered backhoes. No pricing has yet been announced, but Case says while it will be more expensive to begin with, purchasers could make their money back within five years of operation.

In addition to the environmental benefits, Case says that its electric backhoe could save operators as much as 90 percent on service and maintenance costs
In addition to the environmental benefits, Case says that its electric backhoe could save operators as much as 90 percent on service and maintenance costs

“The 580 EV performs like a CASE backhoe — matching the power and performance expected from CASE with the advantages of an electrified machine,” says Eric Zieser, director of global compact equipment product line at Case. “Operators will experience the same digging, lifting and craning performance achieved in a diesel-powered machine in a quieter, emissions-free work area. That’s the ultimate goal of our sustainability efforts — improve the world around us, make equipment more sustainable, and to do so while finding new ways to improve productivity and the experience of the people who use the equipment.”

Case says it has already sold two units to utility companies in the US, and hopes to scale up production as demand grows for its electric backhoe in the coming years.

You can check out the promo video for the 580 EV below.

CASE Introduces the Industry's First Fully Electric Backhoe Loader

Source: Case

3 comments
-dphiBbydt
Excellent progress. There seems little doubt that farming equipment also would be a prime candidates for electric technology conversion. Most farm vehicles need to be slow, require huge torque, heavy weight is a bonus and don't do many miles per day. Conversion to electric would seem ideal.
paul314
For a lot of work in urban areas this would be ideal. Lose the point source of really unpleasant diesel emissions (especially when an engine gets mistuned, which seems to be always) and lose a lot of the incredibly loud noise. And yeha, range anxiety not generally a problem for these kinds of machines.
Bruce Anderson
This can work provided there is a charging capability at the site. That is not always the case, especially in new construction. By the time there is serious power at the site the backhoe work is mostly done. And for remote work, unless it is for one day then back to the shop, this is not the right application.