Automotive

Ford Europe will sell only all-electric passenger cars from 2030

Ford Europe will sell only all...
From 2030, all Ford passenger vehicles sold in Europe will be 100 percent electric
From 2030, all Ford passenger vehicles sold in Europe will be 100 percent electric
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From 2030, all Ford passenger vehicles sold in Europe will be 100 percent electric
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From 2030, all Ford passenger vehicles sold in Europe will be 100 percent electric
Ford's Cologne production facility is being transformed into a dedicated e-mobility center
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Ford's Cologne production facility is being transformed into a dedicated e-mobility center

Ford unveiled its first all-electric passenger car back in 2011, giving folks attending the 2012 Geneva Motor Show the first opportunity to get in the driving seat. Other models have of course followed, and now the company's European wing has committed fully to the electric road ahead with plans to sell only 100 percent electrics by 2030.

Ford's current all-electric timeline began with a US$22 billion global investment in electrification through to 2025, and a plan for every new passenger car that it sells in Europe to be capable of driving in zero-taiilpipe-emission mode, all electric or plug-in hybrid within five years.

Beyond 2026, the company will start phasing out production of plug-in hybrids on the road to going all electric by the end of the decade.

As part of this newly announced EV push, a $1 billion facelift of Ford's vehicle assembly facility in Cologne will see it transformed into the Ford Cologne Electrification Center, which will not only be the firm's first plant dedicated to the production of electric vehicles but the manufacturing home of the first volume all-electric passenger car built in Europe – which will enter production in 2023. Production of a second EV is currently under consideration, too.

Ford's Cologne production facility is being transformed into a dedicated e-mobility center
Ford's Cologne production facility is being transformed into a dedicated e-mobility center

"The decision to make the production and development site in Cologne the e-mobility center for Ford in Europe is an important signal to the entire workforce," said chairman of the General Works Council of Ford-Werke GmbH, Martin Hennig. "It offers a long-term perspective for our employees and at the same time encourages them to help shape this electric future."

"We will offer an exceptional range of electrified vehicles, supported by customer-centric digital services and experiences, allowing our customers to come with us on the journey to a fully electric future, starting right now with the launch of the all-electric Mustang Mach-E," added Stuart Rowley, president of Ford Europe.

The European operation is also making similar moves for its commercial vehicles, with its entire range becoming "zero-emissions capable, all-electric or plug-in hybrid" by 2024. The company expects pure electrics or plug-in hybrids to make up two thirds of its sales by 2030.

The Ford Europe news follows the announcement of a similar all-electric future vision from Jaguar Land Rover earlier this week.

Source: Ford

9 comments
Nobody
They should enjoy the rolling blackouts with the extra power demand OR everyone will be able to afford a new car along with their own solar panels to keep it charged. Right?
TomLeeM
While I think electric cars are cool and green, I am not sure they are up to the same range, cost and time to recharge as gas powered cars. As the other post indicates, unless they upgrade the power grid before then, it would be great drain on the power grid, hoping that solar power has also gone in price plus wind power becomes more effective without killing birds.

Personally I think hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are the future. There are a lot of naysayers on it but I think it is better than battery powered vehicles. There is River Simple that is developing hydrogen fuel cell vehicles; the first being Rasa.
aki009
Virtue signaling is strong here. I'm not sure how exactly they plan to achieve that goal while expecting "renewables" to fill in the massive gab between power capacity and demand.

And who would buy those cars? Unless cities in Europe are going on a massive electric charging post construction campaign, the only customers for these cars will be those lucky enough to be able to park their car in a garage with a power outlet. That's not exactly common in Europe. Not to mention the need for someone to figure out how to vandal-proof public charging posts in the bigger cities that suffer from civil unrest all too often.
Daishi
@Nobody, TomLeeM, Would investing money into the grid and clean energy sources really be a bad thing? Even if the average price of electricity went form like 12 cents/kWh to 16 or 18 cents/kWh I for sure would not lose sleep over it.
TomLeeM
Daishi, I am not against investing in upgrading the power grid but indicated that it would be required before having everyone switch to battery electric vehicles.

It seems Texas is finding out that wind power and solar power doesn't really work when the wind mills are frozen and the solar panels are covered in snow.

I read that batteries don't do as well in winter as it does in summer. The cold affects the batteries.

I think there will always be a need for ICE vehicles. I think electric vehicles will help but won't totally replace ICE vehicles.
guzmanchinky
This is inevitable, might as well accept it.
GeoffreyR.Gunning
United Nations Plan for 2030. Yes, yes, we've all read about that for years. Klaus Schwab (WEFA): "You won't own anything, but you'll be happy. Everything will be rented." Oh, really?
aki009
@Daishi -- I believe you missed the point that @Nobody made. There is not enough "green" or "clean" energy out there to be had, unless all of Europe goes on a nuclear power plant building binge. And given that this seems to not be happening, the inevitable outcome will be over-reliance on unreliable sources of power that will sooner or later lead to rolling blackouts. The reality is that wind and solar must be backed up by natural gas and coal (or nuclear), and if those aren't sized properly for peak demand, bad things will happen.
Don Duncan
Without govt. subsidies (bailouts?) Ford EU may not be around in 2030. Few see the unmatched rise of TESLA as a threat to the legacy companies. I do. I do a lot of reading/research/thinking/evaluating. The ICE producers stagnated and fought change. Toyota became #1 by constantly (daily) upgrading their production line with a unique bottom up interaction, e.g., exchange/testing of ideas. Others could have done so, but were complacent. But Toyota's top management were dead set against the BEV. Their Prius was not a step forward, it was stop-gap measure to slow down the BEV development. Now they see the future is BEVs but it might be too late for them. I hope so. I have driven their Camry V6 exclusively for 25 years after getting burned by a lemon Prelude. But they could have been first with a BEV and chose the status quo.
Now, even TESLA is behind the innovation. APTERA could crush them all. The only hope for a legacy car company is to fund APTERA.