Automotive

Third-generation Formula E car will run 40% of a race on regen power

Third-generation Formula E car...
The Gen3 car gets a second motor on the front axle for the first time
The Gen3 car gets a second motor on the front axle for the first time
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The Gen3 car gets a second motor on the front axle for the first time
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The Gen3 car gets a second motor on the front axle for the first time
The third-genertation Formula E race car: faster, lighter, more efficient
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The third-genertation Formula E race car: faster, lighter, more efficient
600 kW of regenerative braking power will give the Gen3 car some 40% of the total energy it uses during a race
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600 kW of regenerative braking power will give the Gen3 car some 40% of the total energy it uses during a race
The Gen3 car will make its racing debut later this year
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The Gen3 car will make its racing debut later this year
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Much faster, lighter and more powerful than ever before, the Gen3 Formula E racer also takes regenerative braking to the next level. Unveiled by the FIA today in Monaco, the new car runs a dual-motor powertrain that captures so much regenerative braking energy that it won't need rear brakes.

As before, the chassis will be built by Spark Racing Technology, but this time it'll feature the use of some recycled carbon fiber from the second-gen cars. Williams Advanced Engineering will be supplying the battery pack, and Hankook will take over from Michelin to provide all-weather tires for the series – these will be constructed from 26 percent recycled fibers, and all hoops will be recycled after they're raced.

The electric powertrain raises its limited peak output to 350 kW (469 hp), a huge step up from today's 250-kW (335-hp) cars. That'll raise the top speed to around 322 km/h (200 mph), up from this season's 280 km/h (174 mph).

It also gets a second motor on the front axle for the first time, capable of a peak 250 kW to go with the rear motor's peak 350 kW. Interestingly, this is much more about stopping than acceleration. Under hard braking, the powertrain's full 600 kW (805 hp) will be accessible, giving the Gen3 car more than twice the regenerative braking capacity of its forebears. The e-brake will be so strong that these cars won't even run hydraulic brakes on the rear wheels, and the FIA projects that a staggering 40 percent of the total power used in races will come from the regen system.

600 kW of regenerative braking power will give the Gen3 car some 40% of the total energy it uses during a race
600 kW of regenerative braking power will give the Gen3 car some 40% of the total energy it uses during a race

Of course, this asks a lot of the battery in terms of charging capability, and since the pack can take it, the races will also allow "flash charging" at 600 kW during pit stops, raising the potential of races longer than the "45 minutes plus one lap" format running currently.

"The Gen3 represents the ambitious third age of Formula E and the ABB FIA Formula E World Championship," said Formula E Founder and Chairman Alejandro Agag. "With every generation of race car we push the boundaries of possibility in EV technology further and the Gen3 is our most ambitious project to date. The eyes of the world are on the Principality for the Monaco E-Prix and we are proud to reveal a car that been two years in the making in the historic home of motorsport. My thanks go to the great team behind it at Formula E and the FIA – the future of all electric racing is bright."

Check out a short video below.

FIA and Formula E reveal all-electric Gen3 race car in Monaco

Source: FIA

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5 comments
5 comments
jeronimo
This is very impressive indeed.
Username
In the video it has a definitive batmobile vibe to it!
lon4
I would like to see the 40% regen claim substantiated. When we were developing an ebike drive and braking system ten years ago, we rarely got beyond ten percent regen power. Mostly because the amount of time used while braking was about ten percent of the total time using power. We'll see...
BartyLobethal
@Ion4 - yes the claim needs to be substantiated, although I would think it's being made on the basis of results obtained over the 2 years of development and testing mentioned in the article. This vehicle isn't 'on the drawing board', it's been made and will be raced this year. It depends on the circuit but time spent under brakes on most racing circuits will be much higher than 10%, and braking tends to be hard and right at the limit of grip - a different scenario to that faced by most e-bike users.
Niclas
lon4, have you seen how much an F1 break every corner plus some more times.
Oposite from a bike where you try to plan and avoid breaking.

This i promising. On my hybrid car regenerated energy rate is quite medioker, even if i break soft, not using the mechanical breaks.