Automotive

SAIC's R RYZR tilting 4-wheeler suspends driver and passenger in mid-air

SAIC's R RYZR tilting 4-wheele...
The RYZR looks like a high-fashion moon buggy from above
The RYZR looks like a high-fashion moon buggy from above
View 9 Images
The RYZR looks like a high-fashion moon buggy from above
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The RYZR looks like a high-fashion moon buggy from above
The R RYZER would draw attention from any angle
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The R RYZER would draw attention from any angle
Naked carbon fiber peeks out from under the rear covers
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Naked carbon fiber peeks out from under the rear covers
Tilt-capable tires on hubless front wheels, because why not?
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Tilt-capable tires on hubless front wheels, because why not?
No power or range specs are listed, because the RYZR will never exist
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No power or range specs are listed, because the RYZR will never exist
The tilting chassis allows you to drag some butt in the corners
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The tilting chassis allows you to drag some butt in the corners
A truly open driving experience not even the Ariel Atom could match
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A truly open driving experience not even the Ariel Atom could match
The electronic steering controls can be swung to either side, so your passenger can take over the driving
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The electronic steering controls can be swung to either side, so your passenger can take over the driving
A remarkable exercise from SAIC's design team
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A remarkable exercise from SAIC's design team
View gallery - 9 images

China's SAIC Automotive, one of the biggest manufacturers in the country, has been letting its design team stretch out on some fun and futuristic projects through its SAIC Design studio. This one caught our eye: the R RYZR, an open-air 4-wheel EV focused on making drivers feel very much a part of the environment.

It's pretty out there alright; the R RYZR has two narrow hubless wheels at the front, with curved-profile tires similar to what you'd see on a motorcycle. At the back, there's two much fatter wheels placed almost side by side. As the tire profiles suggest, this thing's designed to lean into corners like a motorcycle, and that always bumps up the fun factor.

There's no roof per se, just an arched spine running back from the open front of the vehicle back to blade-like covers at the rear. The driver and passenger seats are suspended precariously behind the front wheels, with nice big holes behind the footrests for you to stick your boots in and turn your feet into road crayons if that's your jam.

No power or range specs are listed, because the RYZR will never exist
No power or range specs are listed, because the RYZR will never exist

The steering apparatus has no mechanical connection to the wheels; it's all electronic. And it's mounted on an arm extending from the middle of the car that can be swiveled across over to the other side. So you can push the wheel over into your passenger's hands if you want a particularly dramatic end to an argument, or if you need to really dedicate both hands to the nostril you're picking.

Then again, nostrils might be tough to access. The driver in these renders is wearing a full-face helmet, as befits the way this car totally exposes its occupants to the elements. Oh, and you'll need to wear that snazzy white jacket too, because that, apparently, is your ignition key.

Of course, it's never going to be sold. There's a small market for weird little "experience" vehicles like this, and it's currently served by things like the Polaris Slingshot. But the slingshot's a trike, a fact that sets it free from a lot of road safety regulations in the USA. The R RYZR is a blue-sky concept whose chief goal is to develop and stretch design talent, and personally, I reckon it looks terrific in that context.

Check out a bunch more shots in the gallery, or enjoy a closer look in the video below. Man, renders are starting to get frighteningly good.

2022 Saic R RYZR Concept – Blurring the boundaries between a bike and a car

Source: SAIC Design

View gallery - 9 images
4 comments
4 comments
David
Wow! If only the Sinclair C5 had looked like that.
paul314
When I was a kid, we had car whose floorboards had rusted out so you could see the road going by underneath. Had to be really careful where you put your feet getting in. And that was how we knew it was past time to send it to the junkyard.
bergamot69
Road crayons?!

A witty and colourful Australianism if ever I heard one!
Pmeon
Fred Flinstone had one of these.