Automotive

Toyota announces Japanese availability of battery electric C+pod

Toyota announces Japanese avai...
The C+pod measures 2,490 mm long by 1,290 mm wide by 1,550 mm high (98 by 50.7 by 61 inches)
The C+pod measures 2,490 mm long by 1,290 mm wide by 1,550 mm high (98 by 50.7 by 61 inches)
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The C+pod has an interior cabin width of 1,100 mm (43.3 inches)
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The C+pod has an interior cabin width of 1,100 mm (43.3 inches)
The C+pod has a top speed of 60 km/h (37 mph) and a stated range of approximately 150 km (93 miles) per charge
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The C+pod has a top speed of 60 km/h (37 mph) and a stated range of approximately 150 km (93 miles) per charge
The C+pod measures 2,490 mm long by 1,290 mm wide by 1,550 mm high (98 by 50.7 by 61 inches)
3/5
The C+pod measures 2,490 mm long by 1,290 mm wide by 1,550 mm high (98 by 50.7 by 61 inches)
The C+pod has a wheelbase of 1,780 mm (70 inches)
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The C+pod has a wheelbase of 1,780 mm (70 inches)
The C+pod is priced at 1,650,000 yen (about US$15,935) for the X, and 1,716,000 yen ($16,572) for the G
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The C+pod is priced at 1,650,000 yen (about US$15,935) for the X, and 1,716,000 yen ($16,572) for the G
View gallery - 5 images

Many car trips are made with no more than one other passenger aboard, over relatively short distances at residential speed limits. Toyota's new battery electric C+pod was designed with just such scenarios in mind.

Officially launched in Japan on Dec. 25th, the automobile was developed as part of a Toyota project that also includes battery electric vehicles (BEVs) such as the three-wheeled iRoad and the Segway-like COMS. According to the company, the C+pod is intended for short-distance urban daily use – this could include use by corporate clients who need to visit customers on a regular basis.

Looking not unlike Toyota's existing iQ, the two-seater rear-drive C+pod is propelled by a single permanent magnet electric motor in the back, which is in turn powered by a 177.6-volt/9.06-kWh lithium-ion battery pack located beneath the floor in front of the seats. The car has a top speed of 60 km/h (37 mph) and a stated range of approximately 150 km (93 miles) per charge.

The C+pod has a wheelbase of 1,780 mm (70 inches)
The C+pod has a wheelbase of 1,780 mm (70 inches)

A single charge takes five hours using a 200-volt/16-amp charger, or 16 hours using a 100V/6A unit. The vehicle can also be used to provide power to homes during outages – for up to 10 hours – via an accessory power outlet.

The C+pod is being offered in two models: the base X and the somewhat fancier G. They reportedly tip the scales at 670 and 690 kg respectively (1,477 and 1,521 lb), with plastic body panels helping to keep the weight down.

The C+pod has an interior cabin width of 1,100 mm (43.3 inches)
The C+pod has an interior cabin width of 1,100 mm (43.3 inches)

Other features of both versions include front strut coil spring and rear torsion beam coil spring independent suspension; LED head- and tail lights; a Pre-Collision Safety System that detects other vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles; and a sonar-based system that helps to avoid collisions with walls or other stationary objects at low speeds.

Currently only available in Japan, the C+pod is priced at 1,650,000 yen (about US$15,935) for the X and 1,716,000 yen ($16,572) for the G.

Source: Toyota

View gallery - 5 images
8 comments
Tom Lee Mullins
I think it will do well since Japan has a lot of small cars. I doubt it will work in the USA since small cars don't do well. The Smart Fortwo didn't do well and is no longer sold in the US; like other small cars.
TonyB
Take the doors off and add a golf bag holder at the back......
DaveWesely
These would market well in any urban environment. We purchased a used Chevy Spark BEV as a third car for around town and teen use several years ago. It has seen more use than the other two cars combined. We live in urban Kansas. Cheap reliable transportation, best auto purchase we ever made.
Don Duncan
Toyota has a found a niche it can exploit in the BEV. I predict this dept. will expand as the ICE dept. shrinks.
buzzclick
Surprised it's not front wheel drive. 16 grand seems a little high, but it is a Toyota. It illustrates a cultural gap between Americans and the rest of the world. It may take a long time to accept these practical little transporters in the USA. They're still generally preoccupied with giant pick up trucks, SUV's and cars.
Joel Smart
If it could hit 110km/h, it could be used on highways in Canada, and it would seem a lot more practical for use here, outside of a city centre. I always wanted to get an electric ForTwo, but maybe the time just wasn't right for them on this side of the ocean.
DaveSavage
Will they make the passenger seat easy to remove and allow the market to create a line of custom cargo containers to easily fasten to the car seat tie down hardware?
How about doing that for all cars, including the back seat?
Daishi
I hope these appeal to someone but personally I think I'd be more likely to drive an i-Road or a bigger version of that like an Arcimoto with doors than this.