Automotive

World's first $10-million car is back on the market

World's first $10-million car ...
On May 23, 2008, a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder that was formerly owned by Academy-Award-winning actor James Coburn, set a world record auction price of EUR 7,040,000 (US$10,894,900). The rare Nero Black covered-headlamp V12 Spyder caused a frenzy of bidding on the auction block before being purchased by UK media personality Chris Evans. It was the very first car to ever sell for more than US$10 million at auction. Now it's for sale again.
On May 23, 2008, a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder that was formerly owned by Academy-Award-winning actor James Coburn, set a world record auction price of EUR 7,040,000 (US$10,894,900). The rare Nero Black covered-headlamp V12 Spyder caused a frenzy of bidding on the auction block before being purchased by UK media personality Chris Evans. It was the very first car to ever sell for more than US$10 million at auction. Now it's for sale again.
View 6 Images
Joe Macari is selling the thirteenth of the 55 Short-wheelbase California Spyders built - a car with a particularly distinguished provenance that once held the world record price for a car sold at auction.
1/6
Joe Macari is selling the thirteenth of the 55 Short-wheelbase California Spyders built - a car with a particularly distinguished provenance that once held the world record price for a car sold at auction.
Our story from May 2008 details the first car ever to sell for more than $10.0 million
2/6
Our story from May 2008 details the first car ever to sell for more than $10.0 million
On May 23, 2008, a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder that was formerly owned by Academy-Award-winning actor James Coburn, set a world record auction price of EUR 7,040,000 (US$10,894,900). The rare Nero Black covered-headlamp V12 Spyder caused a frenzy of bidding on the auction block before being purchased by UK media personality Chris Evans. It was the very first car to ever sell for more than US$10 million at auction. Now it's for sale again.
3/6
On May 23, 2008, a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder that was formerly owned by Academy-Award-winning actor James Coburn, set a world record auction price of EUR 7,040,000 (US$10,894,900). The rare Nero Black covered-headlamp V12 Spyder caused a frenzy of bidding on the auction block before being purchased by UK media personality Chris Evans. It was the very first car to ever sell for more than US$10 million at auction. Now it's for sale again.
James Coburn owned this 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder for 25 years, with it sharing driving duties with another Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso. Coburn painted it three times (dark blue, silver, and burgundy) and could often be seen driving it in the Hollywood Hills with his friends and Great Escape co-stars James Garner, and Steve McQueen in tow. All three had Ferrari 250 GTs.
4/6
James Coburn owned this 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder for 25 years, with it sharing driving duties with another Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso. Coburn painted it three times (dark blue, silver, and burgundy) and could often be seen driving it in the Hollywood Hills with his friends and Great Escape co-stars James Garner, and Steve McQueen in tow. All three had Ferrari 250 GTs.
The first incarnation of the 250GT California Spider finished fifth outright in the 1959 24 Hours of ours of Le Mans. Hours of Le Mans. In 1961, Ferrari shortened the wheelbase to offer razor-sharp steering, replaced the drums with disc brakes, and the 276 hp three-litre SWB California was born. This car is one of the best known of the limited edition SWB Californias.
5/6
The first incarnation of the 250GT California Spider finished fifth outright in the 1959 24 Hours of ours of Le Mans. Hours of Le Mans. In 1961, Ferrari shortened the wheelbase to offer razor-sharp steering, replaced the drums with disc brakes, and the 276 hp three-litre SWB California was born. This car is one of the best known of the limited edition SWB Californias.
The SOHC, 24-valve, three-litre Ferrari engine produces 276 horsepower and drives through a four speed gearbox, propelling the 1277 kg (2815 lb) California Spyder to more than 140 mph.
6/6
The SOHC, 24-valve, three-litre Ferrari engine produces 276 horsepower and drives through a four speed gearbox, propelling the 1277 kg (2815 lb) California Spyder to more than 140 mph.
View gallery - 6 images

The Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder that was once the world’s most expensive car is on the market again. Twelve years ago, the rare black open-topped V12 sports car became the very first car in history to sell for more than US$10 million when it fetched €7,040,000 (US$10,894,900) at an RM (now RM-Sotheby’s) auction held at Ferrari’s Maranello Formula One test track in Italy.

The car has a remarkable provenance, having been purchased by Hollywood actor James Coburn when he and Steve McQueen went into Brussels during the filming of blockbuster movie, The Great Escape.

James Coburn owned this 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder for 25 years, with it sharing driving duties with another Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso. Coburn painted it three times (dark blue, silver, and burgundy) and could often be seen driving it in the Hollywood Hills with his friends and Great Escape co-stars James Garner, and Steve McQueen in tow. All three had Ferrari 250 GTs.
James Coburn owned this 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder for 25 years, with it sharing driving duties with another Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso. Coburn painted it three times (dark blue, silver, and burgundy) and could often be seen driving it in the Hollywood Hills with his friends and Great Escape co-stars James Garner, and Steve McQueen in tow. All three had Ferrari 250 GTs.

Coburn purchased the car from the famed Garage Francorchamps within minutes of clapping eyes on it for the first time, and loved the car dearly for 25 years before selling it in 1986 when his health began to decline. It was subsequently shown by its new owner, Andrew Cohen of Beverly Hills, at the world famous Pebble Beach Concours on 23 August, 1992 where it won third in class, and then sold on to Bruce S. Lustman of Southport, CT in early 1994.

Lustman and his wife Sandy showed the car extensively during their first year of ownership, taking in the 1994 Cavallino Classic, the 1994 International Ferrari Concours in Monterey and the 1994 Concorso Italiano at The Quail. The couple then enjoyed the GT 250’s performance by campaigning it in the Colorado Grand annually for many years, plus numerous other prestige events.

The first incarnation of the 250GT California Spider finished fifth outright in the 1959 24 Hours of ours of Le Mans. Hours of Le Mans. In 1961, Ferrari shortened the wheelbase to offer razor-sharp steering, replaced the drums with disc brakes, and the 276 hp three-litre SWB California was born. This car is one of the best known of the limited edition SWB Californias.
The first incarnation of the 250GT California Spider finished fifth outright in the 1959 24 Hours of ours of Le Mans. Hours of Le Mans. In 1961, Ferrari shortened the wheelbase to offer razor-sharp steering, replaced the drums with disc brakes, and the 276 hp three-litre SWB California was born. This car is one of the best known of the limited edition SWB Californias.

As we reported in May 2008, the car was sold at auction to British media personality Chris Evans for a world record price, becoming the most valuable car in history for a short period of time. Evans took the car to London dealer Joe Macari for some remedial servicing following his purchase, and Macari appears to have been the car’s de facto minder ever since.

Evans showed the car at Salon Prive in 2008, taking out the people's choice award, and it was also displayed at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in 2008 and 2009.

Interestingly, the car that was the most valuable in the world just 12 years ago is now on the edge of the top 50 most valuable cars ever sold at auction, as 52 cars have now sold for more than eight figures.

Joe Macari is selling the thirteenth of the 55 Short-wheelbase California Spyders built - a car with a particularly distinguished provenance that once held the world record price for a car sold at auction.
Joe Macari is selling the thirteenth of the 55 Short-wheelbase California Spyders built - a car with a particularly distinguished provenance that once held the world record price for a car sold at auction.

Recently listed for sale on Joe Macari’s web site, no price is quoted for the car, and no indication has been given to the expectations of the seller.

This particular 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California Spider is a car of legend. It was the crown jewel of the most miraculous barnfind in history. That's Artcurial's Matthieu Lamoure and Pierre Novikoff who came across the remarkable treasure trove of rare automobiles on a provincial farm in the West of France. Is it any wonder they're grinning - they just found a Ferrari California Spider in a barn. It fetched €16,288,000 ($18,465,733 ) in February, 2015  Full story
This particular 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California Spider is a car of legend. It was the crown jewel of the most miraculous barnfind in history. That's Artcurial's Matthieu Lamoure and Pierre Novikoff who came across the remarkable treasure trove of rare automobiles on a provincial farm in the West of France. Is it any wonder they're grinning - they just found a Ferrari California Spider in a barn. It fetched €16,288,000 ($18,465,733 ) in February, 2015  Full story

Our expectation is that the car will sell for in excess of US$15 million, given that the record price for a California Spider now stands at the $18,465,000 (EUR16,288,000) fetched by movie star Alain Delon’s black 1961 California spider, which was also the world’s most valuable barnfind.

Since the sale of this car in 2008, seven California spiders have sold for more, and a similar number have sold at auction for less, but the remarkable provenance of this car and the fact it will not be subject to around 25 percent in auction fees will most likely see a figure somewhere between $15 and $20 million change hands.

View gallery - 6 images
2 comments
Nelson Hyde Chick
Good money that could be used to help poor and desperate people is instead blown on an ego boost for some rich guy, pathetic.
nick101
A practical grocery-getter!