Architecture

Stunning solar powered home has room for the whole family

Stunning solar powered home ha...
Despite being a large house, Haussicht (or Home View) operates totally off-the-grid
Despite being a large house, Haussicht (or Home View) operates totally off-the-grid
View 23 Images
Despite being a large house, Haussicht (or Home View) operates totally off-the-grid
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Despite being a large house, Haussicht (or Home View) operates totally off-the-grid
The design of Haussicht is based upon an overturned boat
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The design of Haussicht is based upon an overturned boat
Haussicht includes an EV charging point so that excess electricity produced by its solar array can be put to good use
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Haussicht includes an EV charging point so that excess electricity produced by its solar array can be put to good use 
Haussicht is located next to Baufritz’s Erkheim HQ in Bavaria, Germany
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Haussicht is located next to Baufritz’s Erkheim HQ in Bavaria, Germany
Haussicht's secondary dwelling is raised on a concrete plinth and accessed by bridge from the main house or elevator
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Haussicht's secondary dwelling is raised on a concrete plinth and accessed by bridge from the main house or elevator  
The secondary dwelling is envisioned as useful for older generations, such as grandparents
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The secondary dwelling is envisioned as useful for older generations, such as grandparents
On-demand ventilation ensures there's always a steady supply of fresh air inside Haussicht
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On-demand ventilation ensures there's always a steady supply of fresh air inside Haussicht
Haussicht's second floor deck also serves to shade the first floor
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Haussicht's second floor deck also serves to shade the first floor
Haussicht's landscaped garden
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Haussicht's landscaped garden
Haussicht is heated and cooled by an efficient air-source heat pump
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Haussicht is heated and cooled by an efficient air-source heat pump 
Haussicht features a roof-based solar array
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Haussicht features a roof-based solar array
Haussicht has a lot of nice little touches, such as this steel perforated screen
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Haussicht has a lot of nice little touches, such as this steel perforated screen
Inside Haussicht, the decor is very Scandinavian
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Inside Haussicht, the decor is very Scandinavian 
Haussicht comprises a total floorspace of 4,280 sq ft (397 sq m)
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Haussicht comprises a total floorspace of 4,280 sq ft (397 sq m)
Another view of the master bedroom
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Another view of the master bedroom
Haussicht's master bedroom features built-in seating, a fireplace, and a bath
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Haussicht's master bedroom features built-in seating, a fireplace, and a bath
The bathroom in Haussicht's master bedroom
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The bathroom in Haussicht's master bedroom
Haussicht's bathroom
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Haussicht's bathroom
Haussicht has a large lounge that can fit the whole family – and the extended family
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Haussicht has a large lounge that can fit the whole family – and the extended family
Haussicht's lounge features a "seating island" (it really is too big to be called a couch)
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Haussicht's lounge features a "seating island" (it really is too big to be called a couch)
The kitchen area in Haussicht
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The kitchen area in Haussicht
Haussicht has a lot of what the designers call "furnitecture" or furniture that's built into the design of the home, like this kitchen island
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Haussicht has a lot of what the designers call "furnitecture" or furniture that's built into the design of the home, like this kitchen island
Haussicht has a lot of nice little touches, such as this steel perforated screen
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Haussicht has a lot of nice little touches, such as this steel perforated screen
View gallery - 23 images

Prefabricated housing firm Baufritz has collaborated with designer Alfredo Häberli to show that a house can be large, luxurious, and green. Their prototype residence gets all its electricity from solar power, and also has a neat secondary smaller dwelling attached by bridge that's designed as a home for grandparents.

Located next to Baufritz's headquarters in Bavaria, Germany, Haussicht (or Home View) serves as a show home for the company and comprises a total floorspace of 4,280 sq ft (397 sq m), spread over two main floors, plus a wine cellar basement. The home is built primarily from wood and its distinctive look is inspired by an upturned boat.

On the first floor, two kids bedrooms share a bathroom and the master bedroom has its own ensuite. Upstairs lies a large kitchen and dining area and lounge, and a large deck, which also serves to shade the floor below. The interior is a very nice example of Scandinavian-style interior design and is open, inviting and spacious.

The main house is linked by footbridge to a secondary, smaller dwelling that could serve as guest house. Baufritz says it's inspired by the custom of Swiss farmers building themselves a small retirement dwelling when they pass the farm to their kids and is intended for elderly parents or grandparents. It's a nice little pad in its own right and includes a single bedroom, dining area, kitchen, and lounge, with access gained by the bridge or a small elevator.

Haussicht's lounge features a "seating island" (it really is too big to be called a couch)
Haussicht's lounge features a "seating island" (it really is too big to be called a couch)

The sustainable technology and design for this build is significant. Haussicht is relatively air-tight, which means that it requires little energy to heat or cool. On-demand ventilation ensures there's a steady supply of fresh air and power comes from a large roof-based solar panel array. Any excess juice can be used to charge an EV with an integrated charging point.

Heating and cooling duties are handled by a ground source heat pump. This is connected to an underground energy storage tank and a solar thermal system. In winter, even without solar input, the system produces some heat by being buried in the ground, where it's warmer than above-ground.

We've no word on how much a home based on the prototype will cost to build, but it likely won't be cheap.

Source: Baufritz

View gallery - 23 images
6 comments
6 comments
Helios
My mother's words come to mind as I review this project, " If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all."
I'm saying nothing mom....
ljaques
But of course. Everyone needs a 4,280 square foot home. That said, it's an interesting but very expensive house, both to buy and maintain. Kids would love the little lake for RC boats and the living room, for the climbing challenge. Hopefully, the grandparent 'shack' has an elevator, so they won't have trouble getting to and from it. Does anyone else think the master bathroom looks dangerous? With any spilled water, it seems that you could slip and fall headfirst in to the huge tub pretty easily.
Buellrider
Beautiful home. Like ljaques points out and I noticed it also, I wonder how long until someone drowns in that ridiculous bath tub. The thing I really like is the natural wood finish throughout. Probably would be best not to let tree grow near this house otherwise you'd constantly be trying to sweep the leaves out of the deck wood spacing. I'd live in that house in a minute. Love it.
sutski123
"With any spilled water, it seems that you could slip and fall headfirst in to the huge tub pretty easily" - Really? Is that all you find to criticize? You must be pretty clumsy if you can accidentally fall into a waist high bath?????
Wolf0579
If only designers could pack that much coolness into a middle class home. I'm sure the executive making a couple million a year is very happy with his one-of-a-kind home. It is very beautiful. I love the wood interior. I'd incorporate into the fireplace a rocket mass heater if I were the designer... but with the target buyer (the execs making millions,) efficiency isn't really the point.
gybognarjr
Very nice, very cold, appears to be more like a modern museum and not at all a home. The wooden deck and floors are nice, but highly impractical, requires a lots of expensive upkeep and treatment, especially in four season climate. How about a two car garage with its own solar panels on the roof to charge the car batteries, so more energy remains for the main house? I have been designing expensive and super expensive homes for over 40 years, traditional and modern style houses, but my clients want to live in a home, even when it is for show and entertainment and not being a display in a modern museum.