Mobile Technology

Bevel brings another dimension to smartphone photography

Bevel is a 3D photography attachemnt that works with both iOS and Android devices
Bevel is a 3D photography attachemnt that works with both iOS and Android devices
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The company’s app, Cashew, allows users to share 3D pictures on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, etc
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The company’s app, Cashew, allows users to share 3D pictures on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, etc
Bevel attaches to a smartphone or tablet via the headphone jack
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Bevel attaches to a smartphone or tablet via the headphone jack
Bevel is small enough to fit in a pocket
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Bevel is small enough to fit in a pocket
Bevel is a 3D photography attachemnt that works with both iOS and Android devices
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Bevel is a 3D photography attachemnt that works with both iOS and Android devices
Creating a 3D image requires that you "pan" your subject
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Creating a 3D image requires that you "pan" your subject
Bevel is priced at US$49
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Bevel is priced at US$49
Matter and Form, the company behind Bevel, is raising money for its production on Kickstarter
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Matter and Form, the company behind Bevel, is raising money for its production on Kickstarter

Sticking with what it knows, Toronto-based Matter and Form has created Bevel, an accessory that turns smartphones and tablets into 3D cameras. Unlike the 3D Scanner the team released last year, Bevel isn't specifically intended for creating detailed 3D models of objects for 3D printing or animating, but for capturing everyday events that can then be shared in 3D.

Bevel connects to iOS or Android devices via the headphone jack and allows users to capture three-dimensional images without much more effort than taking your standard photograph. The device packs an eye-safe laser which the photographer pans over the subject to capture depth information, while the mobile device's camera takes a photo as normal. The optimum subject distance is currently around 1 m (3.3 ft), the the team is looking to bring the capability to capture buildings and even entire cities in a future release.

The resulting image can then be viewed within the Bevel app and the company’s app, Cashew, which allow users to share 3D photos in places like Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and Pinterest. Images can be rotated within the apps to can get just the right angle and can also be turned into animated GIFs or saved to be used later in an animation or 3D printing project –although the team says it is still ironing out the details on exactly how 3D printing compatibility will work.

The choice of device to pair with Bevel will make a difference to image quality, with Matter and Form recommending a device with an accelerometer and a gyroscope, and Kit-Kat or higher for Android devices and iOS or higher for iOS devices. Bevel is powered by its own rechargeable battery so won't drain the mobile device it's connected to.

As with its 3D Scanner, Matter and Form has prioritized affordability with Bevel and has gone the crowdfunding route to raise funds to get the device into production. The company has passed US$120,000 on the way to the $200,000 campaign goal, with just over three weeks left to run. The minimum pledge amount to reserve a Bevel, charging cable, calibration card, Bevel app and access to Cashew is $49, with deliveries estimated for early next year assuming all goes to plan.

Source: Matter and Form, Kickstarter

3 comments
Deres
I think there is a big market for such gadget to clip on a smartphone. Many sensor are interessant but asked by a limited number of users. For instance IR camera, fisheye camera, camera with long flexible neck, microscope, ...
StWils
Once again, former congressman Anthony Wiener will feel cheated by destiny by having peaked far too soon.
riczero-b
This seems overcomplicated for most people's use: why not just add another camera to take a conventional stereogram, for which there is a lot of free software.