Bicycles

Bigo bicycle turn indicator is activated by head-tilts

Bigo bicycle turn indicator is...
Bigo is presently on Kickstarter
Bigo is presently on Kickstarter
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The complete Bigo/miniBigo system (the wireless charger is an optional extra)
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The complete Bigo/miniBigo system (the wireless charger is an optional extra)
Bigo is presently on Kickstarter
2/3
Bigo is presently on Kickstarter
The Bigo IMU works with an adhesive-backed mount
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The Bigo IMU works with an adhesive-backed mount
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We've seen a number of LED turn indicators for bicycles, almost all of which are activated by a handlebar-mounted remote. The hands-free Bigo is different, however, in that it's triggered by a tilt of the head.

Developed by Colombian startup Cinnov, the Bigo system consists of two parts – there's a flexible LED panel that magnetically attaches to the cyclist's backpack or jacket, and a waterproof IMU (inertial measurement unit) that easily slides in and out of a GoPro-like mount on top of their helmet.

The panel sits inside a transparent waterproof sleeve, and the IMU itself is water-resistant. Both units use Bluetooth modules to communicate with one another, through an iOS/Android app on the rider's smartphone.

The Bigo IMU works with an adhesive-backed mount
The Bigo IMU works with an adhesive-backed mount

When initially setting the system up, the cyclist utilizes the app to calibrate the IMU. In this way, they ensure that it won't be accidentally triggered by subtle, unintentional head-tilts. Once that task is complete, they subsequently just power the system up and start pedalling.

As long as they're going straight, the LEDs will display pulsing arrows pointing forward. When they purposefully tilt their head to either side, though, the arrows switch to pointing in the direction of that tilt. After several seconds, the arrows automatically revert to pointing forward.

There are actually two versions of the system – there's the standard Bigo, with its 225 by 195 mm (8.9 by 7.7 in) display, and miniBigo, which has a smaller 114 by 114 mm (4.5 by 4.5 in) display. The reported battery life per charge is three hours for the former, and six hours for the latter.

The complete Bigo/miniBigo system (the wireless charger is an optional extra)
The complete Bigo/miniBigo system (the wireless charger is an optional extra)

Should you be interested, the setup is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. If everything goes according to plans, a pledge of US$45 will get you a miniBigo, with $59 required for a full-size Bigo.

You can see the system in use, in the following video.

Sources: Kickstarter, Bigo

Bigo Safe (Canceled)

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1 comment
Eric Blenheim
Daft idea, many accidents will be inevitable.