Bicycles

Canyon introduces KIS self-centering steering for mountain bikes

Canyon introduces KIS self-centering steering for mountain bikes
The KIS system is debuting on Canyon's Spectral CF 8 KIS trail bike
The KIS system is debuting on Canyon's Spectral CF 8 KIS trail bike
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The KIS system is debuting on Canyon's Spectral CF 8 KIS trail bike
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The KIS system is debuting on Canyon's Spectral CF 8 KIS trail bike
An x-ray view of the KIS system
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An x-ray view of the KIS system
A slider control is used to adjust the KIS system's spring tension
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A slider control is used to adjust the KIS system's spring tension
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When mountain biking over rough terrain, a fair bit of effort goes into keeping the front wheel from being deflected to one side by roots, rocks or other obstacles. Canyon Bicycles has set out to make things easier, with its KIS self-centering steering system.

Standing for "Keep It Stable," KIS was designed for Canyon by fellow German manufacturer Syntace. The technology is also being offered on bikes made by Syntace-owned company Liteville.

In a nutshell, the setup consists of two side-by-side springs located inside the top tube, which are joined via two polymer fiber bands to a cam ring that encircles the steerer tube. As the front wheel and handlebars turn to one side, the spring on the opposite side gently pulls them back towards a forward-facing home position – importantly, it doesn't yank them, so riders can still steer with no problem.

An x-ray view of the KIS system
An x-ray view of the KIS system

Utilizing a mechanical slider control on top of the top tube, it's possible to adjust spring tension based on factors such as the rider's size, weight and riding style, along with the local terrain. The slider is locked and released by tightening and loosening an integrated hex bolt, so it can't be moved accidentally.

And as an added bonus, a built-in rotation stop keeps the system from over-extending, as it doesn't allow the front wheel to turn too far to either side.

According to Canyon, KIS is designed to assist riders in three ways. First of all, it helps them hold their line while going through rough sections, reducing both the likelihood of accidents and the effort required to hold the wheel straight. Secondly, it boosts confidence while riding at high speeds. And finally, it keeps the front wheel from flopping from side to side while climbing, allowing riders to concentrate more on pedaling and less on correcting their steering.

A slider control is used to adjust the KIS system's spring tension
A slider control is used to adjust the KIS system's spring tension

The whole system reportedly weighs just 110 grams (3.9 oz), and requires no maintenance. It's debuting on Canyon's Spectral CF 8 KIS trail bike, although other models should soon follow.

There's more information in the following video.

CANYON SPECTRAL K.I.S | The next evolution in steering dynamics

Source: Canyon via BikeRadar

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3 comments
3 comments
Constantino Lozano
Just like riders who only ever learned on full suspension rigs, I can't wait until owners of these bikes try to ride one that actually requires skill.
Peter. W.
Wow, another amazing cycling gimmick designed to solve a problem that never existed! What next riderless bikes?
TpPa
The words - the springs give a gentle assist - nothing giving a gentle assist can help keep the handles bars straight from the jerk from roots, and rocks. What they need are some small pistons filled with something like Oobleck - "corn starch water mix"