Bicycles

Gesture-tracking, car-detecting helmet now available to beta testers

Gesture-tracking, car-detectin...
For the beta program, the Classon helmet is being offered in color choices of blue, black or white
For the beta program, the Classon helmet is being offered in color choices of blue, black or white
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The Classon helmet, seen from behind
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The Classon helmet, seen from behind
A front view of the Classon helmet
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A front view of the Classon helmet
Controls and rider-alert LEDs are located on the underside of the Classon helmet's visor
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Controls and rider-alert LEDs are located on the underside of the Classon helmet's visor
For the beta program, the Classon helmet is being offered in color choices of blue, black or white
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For the beta program, the Classon helmet is being offered in color choices of blue, black or white
View gallery - 4 images

Although there are now a variety of turn-indicator-equipped bike helmets, cyclists still ought to also use traditional arm signals. That's where the Classon helmet comes in, as its indicator LEDs are trigged by the rider's arm gestures – plus it warns of cars approaching from behind.

When we last heard about the Classon, it was the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. That campaign was successful, and the helmet is now being offered to buyers/test subjects as part of a beta program.

Like a lot of other "smart" helmets, it's equipped with a headlight, a tail light/brake light, and amber LED turn indicators to either side on both the front and back. It also has both front and rear video cameras. All those electronics are wired into two onboard 1.2-GHz microprocessors, and are powered by a 2,800-mAh lithium battery that should be good for up to four hours of runtime per one-hour charge.

A front view of the Classon helmet
A front view of the Classon helmet

Whenever the wearer executes a traditional left- or right-turn arm signal, "gesture sensors" in the helmet reportedly detect that movement, and trigger the helmet's turn indicators accordingly. We're still waiting to hear back from the manufacturer – New York-based Beyond, aka Brooklyness – regarding what form those sensors take.

The headlight and tail light remain illuminated consistently, although when an integrated accelerometer detects that the bike is suddenly slowing down, it triggers the tail light to temporarily brighten and serve as a brake light.

Both video cameras can be used to record rides – just for fun, or for legal use in the event of an accident – with up to six hours of their footage being saved on the helmet's internal memory. Additionally, if the rear camera "sees" a vehicle approaching from behind in the cyclist's blind spot, the rider is warned via blinking LEDs on the underside of the helmet's visor.

The whole thing weighs a claimed 580 grams (1.2 lb), and is IP65 water-resistant – that means it can withstand low-pressure jets of water from any direction.

You can get in on the beta program via the Source link below, with one helmet costing you US$199. Once the Classon reaches full production, the price should rise to $399.

Source: Beyond

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2 comments
2 comments
MarkGovers
Wow, this seems like a great move forward, though I would hope it is well shielded since the noggin is really close to all this electromagnetic wizardry.
cjeam
I'm disinclined to spend $400 on something with that much technology in it that if I have an accident while wearing it has to be replaced.