Bicycles

5,000-lumen Focus headlight lets cyclists "flash their brights"

5,000-lumen Focus headlight lets cyclists "flash their brights"
The Focus headlight mounts below the stem via a GoPro-style attachment
The Focus headlight mounts below the stem via a GoPro-style attachment
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The Focus headlight mounts below the stem via a GoPro-style attachment
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The Focus headlight mounts below the stem via a GoPro-style attachment
The Focus is activated via a bar-mounted remote
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The Focus is activated via a bar-mounted remote
The final version of the Focus will have an injection-molded ABS body, which we're told won't be affected by the heat generated while the light is operating
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The final version of the Focus will have an injection-molded ABS body, which we're told won't be affected by the heat generated while the light is operating
Blinking patterns and other functions can be adjusted via the app
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Blinking patterns and other functions can be adjusted via the app
The Focus also works as a see-the-road headlight, in its 800-lumen Low Beam Mode
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The Focus also works as a see-the-road headlight, in its 800-lumen Low Beam Mode
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While bicycle headlights do help cyclists see the road, they also make those cyclists considerably more visible to motorists. The Focus headlight was designed very much with the latter in mind, as it can grab drivers' attention by flashing at a whopping 5,000 lumens.

Currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, the Focus is manufactured by Italian startup BYB Tech – the company previously brought us a telemetry system for assessing the suspension settings on mountain bikes.

Despite the fact that it's so bright (most urban bike lights are rated at no more than about 200 lumens), the Focus is quite small and lightweight. It measures 66 x 41 x 16 mm (2.6 x 1.6 x 0.6 in), and reportedly tips the scales at 49 g (1.7 oz). A GoPro-style attachment is used to mount it below the handlebar stem.

The final version of the Focus will have an injection-molded ABS body, which we're told won't be affected by the heat generated while the light is operating
The final version of the Focus will have an injection-molded ABS body, which we're told won't be affected by the heat generated while the light is operating

Utilizing either a bar-mounted remote or pushbuttons on the light itself, riders can operate the Focus in one of four fashions.

These include High-Beam Mode, in which it can be manually flashed at its maximum 5,000-lumen output; Front Beacon Mode, in which it continuously blinks at 5,000 lumens; Low Beam Mode, in which it shines steadily at 800 lumens; and Rear Red Mode, in which it's mounted on the back of the bike, and its three LEDs blink or shine steadily in red at 300 lumens.

One 15-minute charge of its racing-drone-derived lithium battery should reportedly be good for 1,000 flashes in High-Beam, 20 hours of use in Front Beacon, six hours in Low Beam, and 20 hours in Rear Red. It should be noted that in Front Beacon and Rear Red modes, an app can be used to select between four different blinking patterns.

The Focus also works as a see-the-road headlight, in its 800-lumen Low Beam Mode
The Focus also works as a see-the-road headlight, in its 800-lumen Low Beam Mode

Because the Focus incorporates an IMU (inertial measurement unit), it can be set to automatically power itself up when the bike starts moving, and shut down once the bike has remained still for some time. In conjunction with the app, the IMU is also used when initially mounting the headlight, to ensure that it's tilted at an angle where it won't blind other road users.

The Focus additionally packs an onboard ambient light sensor, which can be activated to automatically adjust the LEDs' output level for maximum visibility based on the current lighting conditions.

Assuming the Focus headlight reaches production, a pledge of €125 (about US$138) will get you one – a wireless version of the hard-wired handlebar remote is available as an added extra. The planned retail price of the light is €249 ($274).

Source: Kickstarter

View gallery - 5 images
9 comments
9 comments
paul314
That's substantially more than many automotive headlights. I hope riders use it wisely and don't end up sending drivers off the road or into a cyclist.
claudio
@paul314: with a 125/249€ price tag, there won't be many of those around, don't worry...
Rustgecko
Car headlights are 700 lumens and 1200 on high beam. It could be considered to be at best rude, and at worst downright dangerous to be flashing a driver with a beam four times stronger than a car headlight.
Catweazle
The dazzle potential and recovery of night vision time from a tiny 5,000 lumen source sound dangerous to me.
dan
How to get the crap beat out of you on the side of the road as a biker 101. Use these. Folks get super angry from a horn honk, what do you really think is gonna happen if a biker tries it? No common sense.
Alex
Ослепить встречного водителя? Не самая хорошая идея
Glen Aldridge
$550. for a light set seems over the top to me when it's made of plastic. You can buy quite suitable, quality headlights with aluminum cases to withstand an impact for around $125. so for less than half the price for a set will probably make these a hard sell. I'm not sure of the implications of flashing others with 5000 lumens either when some of the brightest bike lights I see are already dazzling to other drivers/riders coming towards you.
Brian M
There needs to be some level of specification and legislation to control these lights, besides the dangerous dazzling effect there is also the risk to those affected by flashing lights.
fen
It's illegal in europe to have a flashing lamp on a bike but they dont enforce it, but they should for this. I was walking through a park on my way home and it had no lights, a delivery cylist cut off the road and had a bright flashing light, and it totally blinded and disorientated me, i had to stand still and actually thought they were going to hit me. I imagine it would have triggered an epilipsy attack for sure it was so intense. If anyone triggers an attack with one of these lights they should be sent to jail. If you can get sent to jail for sending flashing gifs to people this thing should get you locked up too.