Bicycles

Rad Power Bikes introduces entry-level RadMission ebike for $999

Rad Power Bikes introduces ent...
The RadMission is the cheapest ebike offering from Rad Power Bikes
The RadMission is the cheapest ebike offering from Rad Power Bikes
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The RadMission electric metro bike is available with mid-step (shown) or high-step frames
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The RadMission electric metro bike is available with mid-step (shown) or high-step frames
The RadMission is the cheapest ebike offering from Rad Power Bikes
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The RadMission is the cheapest ebike offering from Rad Power Bikes
The Li-ion battery is reported good for between 25 and 45 miles of per charge range
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The Li-ion battery is reported good for between 25 and 45 miles of per charge range
The RadMission weighs in at under 50 pounds
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The RadMission weighs in at under 50 pounds
Full fenders are available as an optional accessory
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Full fenders are available as an optional accessory
The RadMission is available with a 500-W geared hub motor in the US and a 250-W version for Europe
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The RadMission is available with a 500-W geared hub motor in the US and a 250-W version for Europe
The RadMission rides on 27.5 x 1.95-inch Kenda Kontact tires
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The RadMission rides on 27.5 x 1.95-inch Kenda Kontact tires
View gallery - 7 images

After announcing the latest version of its RadWagon electric cargo bike last month, Rad Power Bikes has now unveiled the RadMission electric metro bike, which sports conventional city bike looks and a price tag of under a grand.

"I’m really hoping that this is the first ebike for people who are just waking up to the fact that they don’t need a car to survive anymore," said Rad Power Bikes founder and CEO, Mike Radenbaugh. "Bikes like these can get you from Point A to Point B, cut down on emissions, save money on gas, and ultimately change the entire transportation game.

"If that rider ends up eventually moving beyond it, great. If they have kids and suddenly realize they need child seats, we have bikes for that. If they end up moving out of the city and spending more time outdoors or off-road, we have bikes for that. This is an entry point, but one that’s simple, affordable, and, frankly, really exciting."

Where other Rad models offer a more upright riding position, the RadMission was designed with a lean-forward stance. It features a single-speed drivetrain, but with a geared hub motor to provide sufficient power to tackle inclines, and riders can choose between cadence-sensing pedal-assist or twist-grip throttle.

The RadMission electric metro bike is available with mid-step (shown) or high-step frames
The RadMission electric metro bike is available with mid-step (shown) or high-step frames

US buyers get a 500-W motor for a top speed of 20 mph (32 km/h) and there's a 250-W version for Europe that tops out at 15.5 mph (25 km/h). And Rad has included a new 48-V/10.5-Ah Li-ion battery for between 25 and 45 miles (40 - 72 km) of per charge range.

The RadMission's 6061 aluminum frame comes in high-step and mid-step versions – the former being suitable for riders between 5.8 ft and 6.4 ft (1.778 and 1.956 m), while the latter should suit those between 5.12 and 6.12 ft (1.575 and 1.88 m). The ebike tips the scales at under 50 lb, though no specific weight has been given, and can handle up to 275 lb (125 kg) of payload capacity.

Elsewhere, there's a 40-lux headlight and integrated brake light, LED control panel, 27.5-inch rims wrapped in 1.95-inch-wide Kenda Kontact puncture-resistant tires, and stopping power comes from Tektro disc brakes.

The RadMission is available in five colors and goes up for pre-order today for US$999 – that's 500 bucks less than Rad's latest electric commuter bike. Optional accessories include a front basket, rear cargo rack, full fenders and adjustable kickstand.

Product page: RadMission

View gallery - 7 images
3 comments
DaveWesely
40 lux headlight? At what distance? Lux is measurement of the amount of light hitting a surface per unit area. Lumens is measurement of light emitted from source.
DavidB
I wonder why the front and rear wheels have different arrangements of spokes...
michael_dowling
I hate bicycles,partly because I have had some very close calls with a-hole car drivers when I was younger. My city,like many others,does not have a network of dedicated bike paths,which would be the only thing that would convince me to use a bicycle again,electric or regular.