Bicycles

Seeker setup combines bike lights, dashcam and actioncam

Seeker setup combines bike lig...
The Seeker R1 tail light module, with the Seeker One camera mounted inside to serve as a rear-view camera/dashcam
The Seeker R1 tail light module, with the Seeker One camera mounted inside to serve as a rear-view camera/dashcam
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The 4K/30fps Seeker One camera has front and rear screens
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The 4K/30fps Seeker One camera has front and rear screens
The R1 unit can be used with or without the Seeker One camera
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The R1 unit can be used with or without the Seeker One camera
The Seeker R1 tail light module, with the Seeker One camera mounted inside to serve as a rear-view camera/dashcam
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The Seeker R1 tail light module, with the Seeker One camera mounted inside to serve as a rear-view camera/dashcam
The F1 module, with the Seeker One camera mounted inside
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The F1 module, with the Seeker One camera mounted inside
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Given the multitude of currently-available cycling electronics, it's certainly possible that someone could have an actioncam, a rear-view camera and a lighting system mounted on their bike. The Seeker system combines all of those items in one setup.

Manufactured by Chinese electronics company Apeman (yes, really), Seeker consists of the rear-facing seatpost-mounted R1 module, the front-facing handlebar-mounted F1 module, and the waterproof, dual-screen Seeker One 4K/30fps actioncam, which can be mounted inside either unit – if you're feeling rich, you could get two of the cameras and put them in both modules.

Powered by an onboard 5,000-mAh lithium-ion battery, the R1 features a built-in tail light that automatically comes on when it gets dark outside. It can be set to either a 50-lumen rapid flashing mode or a 35-lumen steady mode, plus it laser-projects virtual bicycle lane markings onto the road on either side of the cyclist. The R1 also has an accelerometer-triggered brake light feature, causing it to flash faster and brighter when the bike slows down suddenly.

The R1 unit can be used with or without the Seeker One camera
The R1 unit can be used with or without the Seeker One camera

Video from the R1-mounted Seeker One is displayed in real time on a dedicated app, which also displays data such as current speed and total distance travelled.

Assuming the user has their smartphone mounted on their handlebars, this means that they can simply glance down at their phone to check if any vehicles are approaching from behind. That said, they should still shoulder-check when turning or changing lanes. Additionally, in the event that a vehicle hits them, the incident will have been recorded for use in court.

Like the R1, the F1 has a 5,000-mAh battery, along with an ambient light sensor that automatically turns its headlight on in dim conditions. That light can be switched to three output settings, including 150-lumen rapid flashing and 80-lumen steady modes. The unit can be used on its own, or the camera can be placed inside of it to record first-person-view footage of the user's rides – the app can be utilized to edit and share the videos.

The F1 module, with the Seeker One camera mounted inside
The F1 module, with the Seeker One camera mounted inside

According to Apeman, one charge of the R1 or F1's battery should be good for up to five hours of use. The Seeker One camera can be placed inside either unit and charged along with it, although no figures are available on its battery life.

Should you be interested, the Seeker system will be the subject of a Kickstarter campaign due to begin later this month (at which time pricing will be announced). You can check the Apeman website for updates.

Source: Apeman

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