Bicycles

Spirgrips Plus are a new expression of bar-end handlebar grips

Spirgrips Plus are a new expre...
Spirgrips + are presently on Kickstarter
Spirgrips + are presently on Kickstarter
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Spirgrips + fit handlebars with a diameter ranging between 22.2 mm (0.87") and 31.8 mm (1.25")
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Spirgrips + fit handlebars with a diameter ranging between 22.2 mm (0.87") and 31.8 mm (1.25")
The padded insert (white) reportedly not only makes Spirgrips + a lot cushier, but it also allows them to better conform to the contours of each user's hands
2/3
The padded insert (white) reportedly not only makes Spirgrips + a lot cushier, but it also allows them to better conform to the contours of each user's hands
Spirgrips + are presently on Kickstarter
3/3
Spirgrips + are presently on Kickstarter
View gallery - 3 images

Many cyclists will remember the bar-end handlebar grips that were popular on mountain bikes some time ago. Well, Spirgrips offer a unique take on that basic concept, and they're now being offered in a new-and-improved form.

While old-school bar-end grips were simply vertical extensions added to the ends of a bike's flat handlebars, the original Spirgrips were significantly different – they were mounted between the brake levers and the existing grips, and they were shaped not unlike the brake hoods of a road bike.

As was the case with bar-ends, though, the idea behind them was to give riders more of a choice of hand positions. According to their Geneva-based designers, riding with your hands placed at an angle on the Spirgrips (as opposed to flat on the regular grips), puts your hands more naturally in line with your arm. As a result, users are claimed to experience less wrist pain.

Spirgrips + fit handlebars with a diameter ranging between 22.2 mm (0.87") and 31.8 mm (1.25")
Spirgrips + fit handlebars with a diameter ranging between 22.2 mm (0.87") and 31.8 mm (1.25")

On the new Italian-made Spirgrips + model, a soft and pliable polymer padded insert has been added. This reportedly not only makes the grips a lot cushier, but it also allows them to better conform to the contours of each user's hands. And for users who want to shave every gram possible when racing, the inserts can be temporarily removed – the grips will still work without them.

Additionally, instead of the aluminum used for the body of the original model, Spirgrips + are being offered in the buyer's choice of two other materials: a plastic/glass-fiber composite that's claimed to offer more elasticity and tensile strength, or stronger and lighter carbon fiber. The estimated weight per pair is 70 grams for the former, and 50 grams for the latter.

Spirgrips + are currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where a pledge of €38 (about US$45) is required for a set of the composite grips (about 50 percent off planned retail), and €60 ($71) is needed for the carbon grips (approximately 35 percent off retail). Assuming they reach production, they should ship in December.

Sources: Kickstarter, Spirgrips

View gallery - 3 images
2 comments
Baker Steve
Hmm... In the 1980s, before the advent of mountain biking and the omnipresence of Shimano, I decided that the safest option for a road bike was to invert the standards drops, saw their ends off and mount thumb-shifters in the bar ends. Coupled with the seemingly universally ignored rear-view mirrors (why is this not a legal requirement?), this gave a person-bike interface that offered full view ahead and behind, as well as complete control, without taking the hands off the handlebars or even changing posture.
Grant-53
I mount my bar grips inboard 5 inches either side of the stem. I cover them with padding. This gives me 1 mph improvement in my cruise speed as the air moves around my arms.