Automotive

Electric truck takes up delivery duties for BMW in Munich

Electric truck takes up delive...
BMW's electric truck can cover 100 km on one charge
BMW's electric truck can cover 100 km on one charge
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The truck will complete 8 daily runs between BMW's plant and manufacturer SCHERM's plant in Munich
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The truck will complete 8 daily runs between BMW's plant and manufacturer SCHERM's plant in Munich
BMW's electric truck can cover 100 km on one charge
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BMW's electric truck can cover 100 km on one charge
The truck will be recharged on fully renewable energy sources
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The truck will be recharged on fully renewable energy sources
The Terberg truck the BMW electric 40 ton load hauler is based on
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The Terberg truck the BMW electric 40 ton load hauler is based on
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BMW's electric truck has been let loose on the Munich roads, ready to take up service delivering materials between supplier SCHERM and BMW's manufacturing plant. The 40 ton (36 tonne) truck has a range of 100 km (62 mi), allowing it to work all day without needing a charge.

Based on the Type YT202-EV 4x2 from Dutch manufacturer Terberg, the all-electric truck takes between three and four hours to charge and will complete the 2 km (1.2 mi) trip between SCHERM and BMW eight times a day, for a total daily commute of just 16 km. While the distances may be relatively short, the trucks are doing some seriously heavy hauling, and the environmental benefits of not using diesel powered trucks on that route are significant.

The truck will complete 8 daily runs between BMW's plant and manufacturer SCHERM's plant in Munich
The truck will complete 8 daily runs between BMW's plant and manufacturer SCHERM's plant in Munich

How significant? BMW has committed to charging the trucks using only electricity from renewable sources, which contributes to a saving of 11.8 tons of CO2 every year compared to a standard diesel truck. That's the same amount of CO2 as a 320d would use if you were to drive it around the world three times!

The initial project for the electric truck will last one year, but both partners will look to extend the project if it proves successful – and both will be hoping it is a big success, because of the six figure investment each made in the project initially.

Source: BMW

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5 comments
Freyr Gunnar
> and will complete the 2 km (1.2 mi) trip between SCHERM and BMW eight times a day, for a total daily commute of just 16 km
Is there no easier and cheaper solution to haul goods over such a short distance?
> BMW has committed to charging the trucks using only electricity from renewable sources
Since Germany 1) generates 50% of its electricity from coal, 2) has very little hydropower, and 3) solar panels/wind turbines are high-tech products and, thus, anything but renewable… where is that "green" electricity going to come from? Thunder?
Kie
@ Freyr

Electric vehicles are far more efficient than ICE vehicles, they emit less CO2 per mile even if most of the electricity is generated by coal.

And going forwards, one would expect the share of energy coming from renewables to increase meaning electric vehicles get greener over time.
Stephen N Russell
Need this for So CA alone, then add impetus to add more charging stations citywide or statewide alone
corgidaddy
Wind is renewable. The wind will continue to move our atmosphere and our wind generators for a longer time than Frey Gunnar or even all his progeny will be alive. Sunlight also is renewable. The Sun will continue shining for billions more years. Coal, not so much. Diesel, not so much. Petroleum is a limited resource. Coal also is a renewable resource.
Bruce Miller
Life expectancies of motors, batteries? Cost advantage over Diesel? Did you know that even in Canada diesel fumes are now considered carcinogenic? Benzene molecules escape from Diesels in dofferent states of repair, different temperatures of operation that can and do cause cancer.