Good Thinking

Tiny device says Nope to webcam hackers

Tiny device says Nope to webca...
The Nope 2.0 has an adhesive surface via which it sticks to the device with which it is to be used
The Nope 2.0 has an adhesive surface via which it sticks to the device with which it is to be used
View 7 Images
The Nope 2.0 has an adhesive surface via which it sticks to the device with which it is to be used
1/7
The Nope 2.0 has an adhesive surface via which it sticks to the device with which it is to be used
The Nope 2.0 is designed to work with desktop computers, laptops, mobile phones and tablets
2/7
The Nope 2.0 is designed to work with desktop computers, laptops, mobile phones and tablets
The Nope 2.0 is thin enough so as not to prevent users from fully closing a laptop
3/7
The Nope 2.0 is thin enough so as not to prevent users from fully closing a laptop
Silicone on both sides ensures that devices are protected from any potential scratches
4/7
Silicone on both sides ensures that devices are protected from any potential scratches
The Nope 2.0 measures 11-mm (0.43-in) long, 4.5-mm (0.18-in) wide and just 0.8-mm (0.03-in) deep
5/7
The Nope 2.0 measures 11-mm (0.43-in) long, 4.5-mm (0.18-in) wide and just 0.8-mm (0.03-in) deep
The Nope 2.0 has a living hinge that allows for "a back and forth movement on a super thin scale"
6/7
The Nope 2.0 has a living hinge that allows for "a back and forth movement on a super thin scale"
The Nope 2.0 is installed by peeling off a tab from its 3M VHB adhesive pad, after which it can be attached to a device
7/7
The Nope 2.0 is installed by peeling off a tab from its 3M VHB adhesive pad, after which it can be attached to a device

Although a webcam may appear to be inactive, it's possible for someone to hack into your computer and use it to watch you without your knowledge. The only way to be sure that this isn't the case is to cover the lens, which is just what the Nope 2.0 magnetic privacy shield is designed to do.

As you may have guessed from the name, the Nope 2.0 is a follow-up to an earlier version. That was released in 2013 and Bungajungle, the company behind the device, says it has updated the gadget based on feedback from customers. Among the features of the new version are a different shape and a more streamlined size.

Indeed, the Nope 2.0 really is pretty tiny. It measures 11-mm (0.43-in) long, 4.5-mm (0.18-in) wide and just 0.8 mm (0.03-in) deep. That thickness (or lack thereof) means that it doesn't prevent users from fully closing a laptop, while silicone on both sides ensure that devices are protected from any potential scratches.

The Nope 2.0 is installed by peeling off a tab from its 3M VHB adhesive pad. It can then be stuck to the device with which it is being used. It is designed to work with desktop computers, laptops, mobile phones and tablets and is said to have been given a sleek, understated look aimed at matching the aesthetic of the high-end devices that many of us use.

The Nope 2.0 measures 11-mm (0.43-in) long, 4.5-mm (0.18-in) wide and just 0.8-mm (0.03-in) deep
The Nope 2.0 measures 11-mm (0.43-in) long, 4.5-mm (0.18-in) wide and just 0.8-mm (0.03-in) deep

The shield works by having its two sections held together magnetically, which Bungajungle says allows for "a back and forth movement on a super thin scale." The silicone cover stops them from being accidentally pulled apart, while magnets also encourage the device to flip open or closed as required and hold the sections in pace accordingly.

A Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign for the Nope 2.0 is ongoing. Pledges from US$5 will be rewarded with one or more of the devices. If all goes according to plan, shipping is expected to begin this September.

The video below is the Kickstarter pitch for the Nope 2.0.

Source: Bungajungle, Kickstarter

Nope 2.0 - Live Free

7 comments
Equilibrium
Really! I just cut out a piece of post-it note, the adhesive part. And place it over the camera. I'm I doing it wrong.
jimbo92107
Or half a band-aid... Flip it over to use the webcam.
Jani
When will laptop manufacturers start adding a simple sliding cover? On the electronics side, it would be easy to include hardwired indicator led that lids up when the sensor is powered and agree to keep it unpowered unless used by an application. Simple neglect from the manufacturers side not to address camera privacy with these or dozen other exceedingly simple solutions.
Wolf0579
A layer or two of tape over the microphone port isn't a bad idea either. A while back, I was at a security conference where it was revealed the there had been a worm that was using ultrasonic emissions from laptop's speakers to spread itself to other laptops at conferences, classrooms, and anywhere else laptop users would congregate.
HighPockets
No adhesive smudge, I just take a piece of past board, fold it twice to fit over the top of computer and slide it over the lens. Works fine and is easy to slide off for conferencing.
erock5000
Yep, a Post-It note works perfectly.
kellory
Tape used to be good enough, but not anymore. I recently read of the three letter outfits, working on a method of seeing through black electrical tape. (Most common method). I have a penny taped over the lens. I agree that there should be a positive OFF setting for webcams.