Automotive

"Affordable" Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicle concept has a range of 200 miles

"Affordable" Chevrolet Bolt el...
The Chevrolet Bolt EV concept has a range of 200 miles (322 km) and should cost around $30,000 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
The Chevrolet Bolt EV concept has a range of 200 miles (322 km) and should cost around $30,000 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
View 13 Images
The Chevrolet Bolt EV concept has a range of 200 miles (322 km) and should cost around $30,000 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
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The Chevrolet Bolt EV concept has a range of 200 miles (322 km) and should cost around $30,000 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
A front view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
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A front view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
A rear-side view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
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A rear-side view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
A rear view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
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A rear view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
A side view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
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A side view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
A rear wheel view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
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A rear wheel view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept at the North American International Auto Show 2015 (Photo: Loz Blain/Gizmag)
A front-side view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept
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A front-side view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept
A rear-side view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept
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A rear-side view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept
An aerial view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept
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An aerial view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept
A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's charging socket
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A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's charging socket
A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's interior
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A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's interior
A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's charging touchscreen display
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A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's charging touchscreen display
A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's front seats and central console
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A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's front seats and central console

Two of the biggest obstacles to the widespread adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) have been their prohibitively high prices and limited ranges. Chevrolet's new Bolt EV concept seeks to tackle both of these factors. It is designed to go 200 miles (322 km) per charge and cost from around US$30,000.

Chevrolet says it has used the knowledge gained from its Volt and Spark EVs to produce the Bolt. "We have made tremendous strides in technologies that make it easier and more affordable for Chevrolet customers to integrate an all-electric vehicle in their daily lives," said General Motors CEO Mary Barra.

Amongst the technologies present in the car is the ability to change driving mode depending on the environment in which it is being used. Available modes are tailored towards daily commuting and "spirited weekend cruising," as well as other situations. Selecting different modes changes aspects of the car's setup, such as accelerator pedal mapping, vehicle ride height and suspension tuning. The Bolt is also said to support DC fast charging and has LED headlights and taillights.

A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's interior
A view of the Chevrolet Bolt EV concept's interior

The Bolt's weight has been kept to a minimum by using lightweight materials, including aluminum, magnesium, carbon fiber and woven mesh. This helps to increase the vehicle's range. Chevrolet says the car has been designed in such a way as to minimize any overhang at both the front and the rear, maximizing interior space. A large glass roof and large expanses of glass right around the vehicle, meanwhile, allows plenty of light in and increases visibility.

A variety of technologies are used inside the Bolt aimed at improving the driving experience. A 10-in touchscreen on the dashboard provides vehicle information, whilst the Bolt EV Connect app allows a user's smartphone to be used as a key fob and for ride-sharing management. The app also allows users to exit the vehicle and instruct it to park itself, before summoning it back to their location at a later time.

The Chevrolet Bolt EV concept is currently on display at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. There is no word on commercial availability.

Source: Chevrolet

19 comments
BeWalt
"There is no word on commercial availability." Surprise! Funny enough, Elon Musk said exactly that about big car makers: "they always make these awesome concept vehicles but then you can never buy them" and as if to prove him... thank you General Motors. The true main purpose of this is to make people believe that it is worth waiting for GM to get their act together. And most importantly while doing so *not* to buy anything from Tesla, because, boy - are they afraid of Tesla. Or maybe not just Tesla, but definitely of the electric car.
mhpr262
Not bad at all. Not a sleek, sexy beast like the Model S, but no weird looking geekmobile like the i3 and the LEAF either. Two and a half times the range of the LEAF for a few thousand bucks more, and made in America. I can see this doing well in the market.
Island Architect
Gawd! Ugh!! Looks like some ugly sea creature. Some thing has gone very wrong with product development.
David Best
Do electric cars make sense in the USA where electric prices are increasing, due to EPA regulations causing plant closures? For some of us, the rate varies according to a non-transparent pricing scheme that seems arbitrary and random. I'd be scared to own a car that I have to plug in. My electric bill is already outrageous.
StWils
In a different era folks like David would be whining about the coming automobiles scaring horses or what city needs more than two or three telephones. EPA closes plants because coal is filthy and toxic. Some countries are on the edge of being self sufficient on renewable energy. Denmark thinks they are there now and Germany is getting there. Various development efforts have shown how to make, safely transport and use hydrogen. The next major development & deployment plateau is to start spreading hydrogen throughout society. It will take time and initially will not be clearly cheaper than fossil fuels. Solar and wind already generate lots of megawatts and will generate far more AND get get less expensive. Just a few weeks ago a federal agency, (Not sure which one), showed that either solar or wind has clearly dropped below coal & gas in cost. These trends will continue. GM is slowly moving along toward an electric fleet, sort of. And I am sure Elon Musk will be delighted to flip them off as he and his customers whizz by in Teslas powered by batteries built in the coming massive battery factory planned for western New York. This industrial park is a cooperative development effort joining Companies, New York State and U.S.government in a joint venture. Tea Party pinheads can pound salt.
Ryan Gibbons
David it will still cost less than buying gas. and BeWalt is right, i would wait for the Tesla model 3 over this. Though I'm pretty sure this one will come thru to market... in two or three years.
Nehemiah Spencer
@David Best, if your rates are really bad, you should look into getting solar. Are you on the West Coast? Check out Solar City.
Cyndysub
I will go with what BeWalt said. GM is not a company that I would ever buy a car from they are just a shill for the oil companies. They had to be drug into electric cars kicking and screaming. Proof you say? Just look at the stupid Volt that they said would change america and the best they could do was an electric car that uses gasoline. What idiots. Nissan actually made a good score with the Leaf and they are working on a longer range battery. Tesla is a good car too but the price point needs to be for the common man and not just rich people. Get an electric car that is affordable for the masses and you will have changed our planet for the better.
Noel K Frothingham
David Best, electric utilities have used 'off-peak' power rates for 40+ years. Starting in the mid-70's, the customers using electric hot water heaters to add layers of insulating blankets to the exterior of the tanks and controlling the water heaters to run only during 'off-peak' hours with timers. Why would charging an electric cars batteries be different? Out here in the desert, we use multi-speed heat pumps controlled by programmable thermostats set at 78 degrees. Well insulated ductwork and sun screens keep our homes comfortable during our 110 degree days and 90 degree nights mid-spring to late fall. My highest electric bill on a 1700 sq. ft. house built 'on-slab' with 2x6 exterior walls was $136. last year. Last months electric bill was $36 with an electric hot water heater. Of course we don't have the harsh winter weather that our northern folk deal with, but they don't have to deal with 90 - 95 degree temperatures day AND night. Who needs a water heater to enjoy a hot shower when the plumbing is run through the attic? If we can manage how we live in our local environment to control our energy consumption/cost, so can people in other parts of the country. The ol' water heater on a timer strategy WORKS. An electric car is nothing more than another appliance to be managed.
Michael Erickson
Is there some unwritten rule someplace that an electric car has to look dorky. Tesla is the only one that does not do this. Maybe the other automakers should that that into consideration.