Computers

The $9 CHIP is real computing in a tiny form

The $9 CHIP is real computing ...
CHIP is a US$9 computer that's ready to go by adding peripherals
CHIP is a US$9 computer that's ready to go by adding peripherals
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CHIP comes bundled with open-source applications you're probably used to if you use Linux
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CHIP comes bundled with open-source applications you're probably used to if you use Linux
CHIP quickly turns into a gaming device with the addition of Bluetooth controllers
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CHIP quickly turns into a gaming device with the addition of Bluetooth controllers
Stereo audio out and adding powered speakers turn CHIP into a music composition tool
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Stereo audio out and adding powered speakers turn CHIP into a music composition tool
CHIP is a $9 computer that's ready to go by adding peripherals
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CHIP is a $9 computer that's ready to go by adding peripherals
PocketCHIP takes a CHIP and makes it mobile with a full keyboard and 4.3-in touchscreen
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PocketCHIP takes a CHIP and makes it mobile with a full keyboard and 4.3-in touchscreen
CHIP is a US$9 computer that's ready to go by adding peripherals
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CHIP is a US$9 computer that's ready to go by adding peripherals
PocketCHIP takes a CHIP and makes it mobile with a full keyboard and 4.3-in touchscreen
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PocketCHIP takes a CHIP and makes it mobile with a full keyboard and 4.3-in touchscreen
The CHIP, coming in at a size small enough to fit on a potato chip, and available for a $9 pledge on Kickstarter
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The CHIP, coming in at a size small enough to fit on a potato chip, and available for a $9 pledge on Kickstarter
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From the company that brought us Otto, the gif-capturing camera, comes CHIP, the US$9 computer. Its endowments of 1 gig processing, 4 gig storage, and 512 MB of RAM would only be average, were it not for the price, and the fact that it's ready-to-go despite its svelte stature – small enough to fit on a Post-It note. As with Otto, the company is seeking funding on Kickstarter and is also offering PocketCHIP, an enclosure to turn CHIP into an affordable smart device with touchscreen and keyboard.

One of the most important things to note about CHIP is that it's advertised as ready to go. If you can use a GUI Linux interface (Debian-based), then you can use the pre-installed applications, add peripherals, play games, and compute in a manner you're used to.

In addition to the stats already listed, CHIP comes with a micro USB port, USB, composite headphone/mic port, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, and is powered by attaching a LiPo battery, DC power, or through the micro USB. All this fits on a board measuring 1.5 in by 2.3 in (40 by 60 mm), which in keeping with the $9 price, isn't encased.

Stereo audio out and adding powered speakers turn CHIP into a music composition tool
Stereo audio out and adding powered speakers turn CHIP into a music composition tool

However, Next Thing Co has also designed a cute little case to hold CHIP and add a full keyboard, 4.3-in (10.9-cm) touchscreen, and 3.0-mAH battery – enough for five hours of use. Named PocketCHIP, it resembles an old-school GameBoy in size and adds an interesting way to transition from computing with a full-sized monitor and keyboard to instantly going mobile.

The low price depends on being able to order large quantities of components, and comparing the high number of pledges the CHIP has received with what the company requested, it will certainly be able to do so. Also keeping it low-cost is the decision to use all open-source software. In return, the company will be making CHIP's designs available later as open-source.

Pledges for just the CHIP start at $9, while extras like a battery or video adapters add more, and a pledge of $49 qualifies you to receive a reward of a PocketCHIP case and a CHIP to go in it. The company recently shipped its first batch of Otto cameras and anticipates that should development of the CHIP be successful, those will begin shipping in December, with the cases shipping in May 2016.

Below is Next Thing Co's pitch video for the CHIP.

Sources: Next Thing Co, Kickstarter

CHIP The World's First Nine Dollar Computer by Next Thing Co

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5 comments
bruma
If i want to setup a brand new 9$ pc then i need a screen, total of 24$ plus 20$ transport costs and because of the total amount exceeds 25€ (44$) another 10€ tax. Sorry but a raspberry PI is cheaper on the local market and gives me much more.
Derek Howe
Raspberry Pi has no onboard storage, this does, it has less RAM, and an older (slower) CPU....so your wrong.
bruma
I'm talking about theRaspberry Pi Model 2B for sale at 36,95€ with 1GB of RAM, I can choose the amount of SD card storage starting at 2€
Misti Pickles
Bruma....all those taxes are one more reason to overthrow your socialist masters!. We have the newest Pi as well--paid $89 for the $35 dollar pi, with all cables, power supplies, etc, and dumped another $30 into a new keyboard and mouse. As it hooks into a Telly, we didn't need a monitor. Sounds like the pocket chip would be self contained and half the price? Would it be as powerful as the quad core Pi? Probably not. But your description of the pi certainly leaves out all of the peripherals needed to USE you pi!
Phoghat
It's $9 US, but it's old tech, and s-l-o-w. For about $50 US you can buy the cheapo Chinese tablet they ripped this from, and get all the peripherals too.