Wearables

Cicret wristband turns your arm into a touch screen

Cicret wristband turns your ar...
The Cicret Bracelet will project a tablet interface onto the user's arm
The Cicret Bracelet will project a tablet interface onto the user's arm
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The Cicret Bracelet will project a tablet interface onto the user's arm
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The Cicret Bracelet will project a tablet interface onto the user's arm
The Cicret Bracelet has WiFi, Bluetooth and Micro USB connectivity
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The Cicret Bracelet has WiFi, Bluetooth and Micro USB connectivity
The Cicret Bracelet uses a row of eight proximity sensors to work out where the user's finger is
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The Cicret Bracelet uses a row of eight proximity sensors to work out where the user's finger is
The Cicret Bracelet's proximity sensors work out where the user's finger is and allows them to interact with the display like any other touchscreen
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The Cicret Bracelet's proximity sensors work out where the user's finger is and allows them to interact with the display like any other touchscreen
The Cicret Bracelet is designed to be an independent device
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The Cicret Bracelet is designed to be an independent device
The Cicret Bracelet's proximity sensors work out where the user's finger is by where line
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The Cicret Bracelet's proximity sensors work out where the user's finger is by where line
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The Cicret Bracelet will be available on 10 different colors
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The Cicret Bracelet will be available on 10 different colors

With wearables gaining some traction, smartphones and tablets are by no means the only mobile devices around nowadays. Now, though, Cicret is looking to take things a step farther and turn your arm into a smartphone.

Conceived 12 months ago and designed over the course of 6 months, the Cicret Bracelet is a small wristband that looks similar to the Jawbone Up.

The Cicret Bracelet's proximity sensors work out where the user's finger is and allows them to interact with the display like any other touchscreen
The Cicret Bracelet's proximity sensors work out where the user's finger is and allows them to interact with the display like any other touchscreen

The Bracelet comprises a pico projector and a row of eight proximity sensors that point towards the user's forearm. It operates as a standalone device and, when activated with a twist of the wrist, projects an Android interface onto the users arm, much like Chris Harrison's Skinput research. The proximity sensors detect where the user's finger or fingers are and allow them to interact with the interface as they would any other Android device.

There are potential advantages to turning ordinary objects (or, in this case, limbs) into mobile devices, but projected touch screens typically lack the responsiveness and visual clarity of the glass screens we're used to. This projected keyboard, for example, delivered a poor typing experience.

It should be interesting to see if the Cicret Bracelet can improve on the technology, to make something we'd actually want to use.

The Cicret Bracelet will be available on 10 different colors
The Cicret Bracelet will be available on 10 different colors

Elsewhere, the Cicret Bracelet features an accelerometer and a vibration module, along with an LED for notifications. Connectivity is provided by way of WiFi, Bluetooth and a Micro USB port. It is expected to be made available in 16 GB and 32 GB models.

The device will allow users to send and receive emails, browse the web and play games. It will also be possible for users to pair it with an existing smartphone, answer incoming phone calls and activate the speakerphone functionality on the their smartphone.

Cicret is in the process of raising funds for the further development and production of the Bracelet, but Pommier says he expects the device to reach the mass market within a year and a half. The device could cost up to $400, he says, based on what the company's research suggests people would be willing to pay (sounds like a hard sell to us).

Cicret co-founder Guillaume Pommier tells Gizmag that the first prototype is due for completion in about three weeks time.

The video below provides an introduction to the Cicret Bracelet.

Update (January 7, 2015): In response to queries about the project's progress, Pommier says that "we do have a working prototype now and are working on it to 'upgrade' it." We'll keep you posted.

Update (February 4, 2015): Pommier has now released a short video showing the first working prototype of the bracelet in action, which you can see below. The video page also includes a progress update from the Cicret Team.

CICRET BRACELET FIRST WORKING PROTOTYPE

Source: Cicret

The Cicret Bracelet (Concept video)

22 comments
S Michael
$400.. wow it might cost that much.. But not to me. Who is going to buy this POS. Does nothing.
Matt Fletcher
I don't believe with the current design the technologies available to produce a descent image, work well with finger gestures, hold a charge for very long, or keep from breaking regularly. Someday soon I believe it could work, within a year or 2, just not right now. I could be wrong & I would love to be wrong on this because I really like the idea & will get one someday when they do come out. Also, the video on their website is misleading in that it looks like they have already made one that works, which is not the case. They are raising money to build a prototype which is where they are going to find out it's not so easy (YET).
nummitz
I don't think this will work for two reasons: 1) Projectors need low light to work, it just won't work outside without some serious power pumping or of the device. To see the screen outside I would expect the battery to last 2 minutes. 2) Arm hair, surely there is just going to be too much hair in the way. At that angle, every hair on your arm is in the way, just look down your arm at that perspective and you'll see what I mean. They will have to sell this device with razors so you can shave your arm before each use.
Antony Borlase
People need to look at Kreyos. Promised so much less, and got so much more funding and failed. This is a good use of animation, and will likely get no further than a You-tube video. Just the optics needed to make an image, from a curved band 12mm (say half an inch) that can project down onto your arm and be clear and in focus is daunting. Ask NASA if the stereoscopic imaging on those Mars rovers was easy, this arm band trick will be more problematic. And Nummitz, did you not see the 500m extension cord for the cooling such a powerful light would need?
Pete Buckley
I call bullshit!
kayanlau
Ehhh - and also people with dark skin ... it wouldn't work well now, would it? Sorry, not buying it.
Jaroslaw Filiochowski
This is what CAN and can NOT be done by December 8, 2014: - Tiny accelerometer: NOW - Tiny Bluetooth Low Energy: NOW - WiFi: NOW - Memory Card + ROM: NOW - Vibrator: NOW - MicroUSB Port: NOW - LED: NOW - Button: NOW - Flexible wrist band: NOW - Tiny Processor, good enough for crappy movement: 6 MONTHS - Tiny Processor, phone-like quality: 10 YEARS - Pico Projector, crappy resolution and low brightness: 1 YEAR - Pico Projector, HD quality visible in daylight: 20+ YEARS - Tiny Proximity sensor long range: 2 YEARS - Tiny Battery, good for crappy processor and crappy projector: 10 YEARS - Tiny Battery, for phone-like processor and HD projector: 20+ YEARS Overall estimate: BULLSHIT
Alex Haws
Video is faked, tech isn't there yet, total vapourware.
Mel Tisdale
At the end of the summer some white bits are always more interesting than others. No prizes for guessing which category this is in.
Darin Selby
It work because he no have hairy arm.