Automotive

Citroen builds boxy EV concept for the cities of the future

Citroën imagines its 425-kg (936-lb) Ami One scooting around city centers without too much trouble at all
Citroën imagines its 425-kg (936-lb) Ami One scooting around city centers without too much trouble at all
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One of the driving factors behind the design of Citroën’s Ami One concept was to create a vehicle that was widely accessible
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One of the driving factors behind the design of Citroën’s Ami One concept was to create a vehicle that was widely accessible
A look inside the Ami One concept by Citroën
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A look inside the Ami One concept by Citroën
A look inside the Ami One concept by Citroën
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A look inside the Ami One concept by Citroën
Citroën imagines its 425-kg (936-lb) Ami One scooting around city centers without too much trouble at all
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Citroën imagines its 425-kg (936-lb) Ami One scooting around city centers without too much trouble at all
Citroën will be showing offthe Ami One at Geneva next month
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Citroën will be showing offthe Ami One at Geneva next month
Citroën's Ami One concept is designed to be driven by anyone over the age of 16
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Citroën's Ami One concept is designed to be driven by anyone over the age of 16
The Ami One vehicle is designed to be driven without a license
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The Ami One vehicle is designed to be driven without a license
Citroën's Ami One concept is designed to be driven by anyone over the age of 16
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Citroën's Ami One concept is designed to be driven by anyone over the age of 16
A battery built into the floor of the Ami One concept can be charged in as little as two hours and provide a 100-km-range (62 mi)
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A battery built into the floor of the Ami One concept can be charged in as little as two hours and provide a 100-km-range (62 mi)
A battery built into the floor of the Ami One concept can be charged in as little as two hours and provide a 100-km-range (62 mi)
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A battery built into the floor of the Ami One concept can be charged in as little as two hours and provide a 100-km-range (62 mi)
A look inside the cabin of Citroën's Ami One concept
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A look inside the cabin of Citroën's Ami One concept
A look inside the cabin of Citroën's Ami One concept
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A look inside the cabin of Citroën's Ami One concept
A look inside the cabin of Citroën's Ami One concept
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A look inside the cabin of Citroën's Ami One concept
Citroën's Ami One concept is designed to be driven by anyone over the age of 16
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Citroën's Ami One concept is designed to be driven by anyone over the age of 16
The Ami One vehicle is designed to be driven without a license
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The Ami One vehicle is designed to be driven without a license
The cube-shaped Ami One concept can be recharged in two hours
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The cube-shaped Ami One concept can be recharged in two hours
One of the driving factors behind the design of Citroën’s Ami One concept was to create a vehicle that was widely accessible
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One of the driving factors behind the design of Citroën’s Ami One concept was to create a vehicle that was widely accessible

Much is unknown about how our cities will look in the future, but current indication is that they'll likely be a lot more crowded than they are now, which calls for some creative ideas on how people will move around. Citroën's latest solution to this is a boxy electric two-seater concept imagined as an alternative for buses, bikes and scooters, even for those without a license to drive.

One of the driving forces behind the design of Citroën's Ami One concept was to create a vehicle that was widely accessible. To that end, the cube-shaped vehicle could (at least in theory) be driven without a license by anyone over 16 – even though we'd expect algorithms to be doing most of the driving in our cities of the future. It is designed to serve as an option for those typically relying on public transport or traveling on bikes and scooters.

Citroën's Ami One concept is designed to be driven by anyone over the age of 16
Citroën's Ami One concept is designed to be driven by anyone over the age of 16

Users unlock the door through a QR code scanner on the handle, and hop onboard for as little as five minutes or as much as five hours though a ride-sharing service, with their usage able to be extended on the fly through the companion smartphone app. There would also be leasing options available ranging from five days to five years.

The app also offers info on battery levels and power consumption, along with voice-controlled navigation to guide drivers toward nearby charging stations or carparks. A five-inch display (12.7 cm) serves as the more traditional instrument cluster, while a sunroof roof allows the cabin to open up to the elements.

One of the driving factors behind the design of Citroën’s Ami One concept was to create a vehicle that was widely accessible
One of the driving factors behind the design of Citroën’s Ami One concept was to create a vehicle that was widely accessible

With a length of just 2.5 m and height of 1.5 m (8.2 and 4.9 ft), Citroën imagines its 425-kg (936 lb) Ami One weaving through city centers without too much trouble at all. A battery built into the floor can be charged in as little as two hours and provide a 100-km-range (62 mi). Top speed is listed as non-license-friendly 45 km/h (28 mph).

As is often the case with compact urban mobility concepts, the Ami One is less a vehicle you're likely to see on the road soon and more thought experiment on the future of city transport. In any case, Citroën will be presenting the vehicle at the Geneva Motor Show when it kicks off on March 7.

You can check out the pitch video below.

Source: Citroën

Ami One Concept - Next Generation design by Citroën

3 comments
Axel
No, no, the seating has to be tandem, not side by side. Why? Because in all urban environments, the width of the roads needs doubling twice a day in the rush hours, and the only way to do that is to halve the width of the cars. The challenge is putting a cabin on a motorbike or scooter, because without a cabin, 90% of the population won't use them.
NikBennewitz
The designer either hates Humans or has not thought for a second about ergonomics either. The driverdoor opening frontally will let cars shear off his head while parking parallel on the roadside. If you need one door to open in the other direction take the passengerside, a pedestrian or byciclist will not be able to kill him with his inertia while parked.
AngryPenguin
@Axel They need to consider things like turn radius and stability. When your car is 3 feet wide it's suddenly a lot easier to flip over.
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