Outdoors

Hatchet-spade multi-tool looks perfect for bush people, survivalists and lumberjacks

Hatchet-spade multi-tool looks...
One of three primary tools on both the Combar and Combar pro is the flip-out hatchet
One of three primary tools on both the Combar and Combar pro is the flip-out hatchet
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The Combar Pro packs five tools out of the box and also comes with a storage box to pack your own small tools in
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The Combar Pro packs five tools out of the box and also comes with a storage box to pack your own small tools in
The spade can be used for shovel or pick tasks
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The spade can be used for shovel or pick tasks
The available holster provides a way of carrying the Combar
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The available holster provides a way of carrying the Combar
One of three primary tools on both the Combar and Combar pro is the flip-out hatchet
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One of three primary tools on both the Combar and Combar pro is the flip-out hatchet
On the other side of the hatchet is the hammer head
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On the other side of the hatchet is the hammer head
The spade is also offered on both the Combar and Combar Pro
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The spade is also offered on both the Combar and Combar Pro
The Combar combines multiple outdoor tools into one 
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The Combar combines multiple outdoor tools into one 
Combar hatchet
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Combar hatchet
Aclim8 advertises a lifetime Combar warranty
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Aclim8 advertises a lifetime Combar warranty
Combar packed and ready to carry
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Combar packed and ready to carry
The fixed-blade knife stores inside a sheath in the Combar Pro's handle 
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The fixed-blade knife stores inside a sheath in the Combar Pro's handle 
The folding saw also packs into the Combar Pro handle
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The folding saw also packs into the Combar Pro handle
Aclim8 is now raising money on Kickstarter 
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Aclim8 is now raising money on Kickstarter 
Pulling the knife and saw out of the Combar Pro
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Pulling the knife and saw out of the Combar Pro
Store small tools or gear in the empty magazine ... including a Swiss Army knife
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Store small tools or gear in the empty magazine ... including a Swiss Army knife
Aclim8 also offers a carry case for the Combar
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Aclim8 also offers a carry case for the Combar

Over the years, we've watched multi-tools grow smaller and smaller – we're talking about survival credit cards, keychain multitools and tool-packed watchbands. At the same time, a smaller but louder group has been growing much larger than your typical Swiss Army knife or Leatherman. Here, we're talking about four-in-one saws, survival shovels and multifunctional hiking poles. The latest among the big boys is the Combar from Aclim8, a hatchet-spade that also packs a hammer, folding wood saw and knife – no tiny, ineffectual mini-tools or extraneous bottle openers to see here.

When packed up, the 3.2-lb (1.5-kg) Combar Pro looks like a simple club or baton. Aclim8 promises it has manipulated the aluminum, stainless steel and titanium in a way that makes the device well-balanced and ergonomic. We'd have to get a hand on it to verify, but from looking at it, it does appear to be compact enough for easy, natural use.

The spade can be used for shovel or pick tasks
The spade can be used for shovel or pick tasks

We reckon the Combar could be used as a blunt instrument in a self-defense situation, but it isn't a simple club. At top, it includes a stainless steel hammer head for knocking home tent pegs and taking care of other hammering tasks you might encounter in the wild. Around the hammer, there's also a flip-out spade/pick for shoveling and playing in the dirt. Opposite the spade, a flip-out hatchet takes care of chopping up wood.

That's a pretty nice trio of important outdoor tools right there, but the Combar takes it further. Flip the access hatch at the bottom of the handle and slide out two additional tools – a knife with 4.5-in (11.5-cm) fixed steel blade and skeletal glass-reinforced nylon handle and a folding saw with replaceable saw blade. Now you can add all kinds of other sawing and cutting duties to the list of tasks the Combar can handle on its own, from sawing branches for shelter and fire to slicing and dicing dinner.

Pulling the knife and saw out of the Combar Pro
Pulling the knife and saw out of the Combar Pro

Maybe you already have a knife and saw or maybe there's just something more important you'd like to carry in your Combar multi-tool. With the included empty magazine, you can store your own small tools or survival provisions in the handle in place of the knife and saw. Aclim8 doesn't mention it being watertight, so you'll probably want to avoid tinder or matches, but you can easily come up with a custom kit of tools and supplies to fill the magazine up.

Store small tools or gear in the empty magazine ... including a Swiss Army knife
Store small tools or gear in the empty magazine ... including a Swiss Army knife

Aclim8 is an Israeli-based startup founded by special forces veterans and recreational adventurers. It aims to design reliable, functional products for hunters, campers, survivalists, off-roaders and other user groups. It promises that the Combar is built tough and has been tested in extreme conditions, backing that promise up with a lifetime warranty.

Aclim8 launched a Kickstarter campaign today and is offering two different versions of the Combar, both with the flip-out hatchet, spade and hammer. The Combar Pro with all the tools and the empty magazine described above starts at the US$479 pledge level (limited time), while the Combar, with magazine but no knife or saw, starts at the $339 level (also limited time). Retail pricing is estimated at $499 for the Combar and $799 for the Combar Pro.

Even the Kickstarter early bird pricing seems sky-high to us and more expensive than buying individual tools from other brands. For comparison, the three-in-one Zippo AxeSaw, which appears to be a simplified derivative of the Woodsman four-in-one-saw mentioned in the opening paragraph, retails for $80, packing a hatchet, bow saw and stake mallet. Sure, the Combar Pro has a couple more tools and uses ... but is that worth 10 times the retail price?

The pricing hasn't stopped Kickstarters from getting behind the campaign with their wallets. In less than a day, Aclim8 is already nearing its $55,000 goal at over $51,000 as of publishing.

Here's the Combar Kickstarter promo video:

COMBAR™ | An Incredibly Rugged Heavy-Duty Multi-Tool

Source: Combar

4 comments
W8post
ONLY the fact that there is a 'Pro' version, turns me off! There should be ONLY one version, a complete tool! Going out in the bush means I need a saw; so why pay extra for it? Combar will come with the argument (probably)'not everybody needs a saw' so why pay extra for something you don't need? BULL! I've got the heaviest Victorinox Swiss Army knife, use it all the time, but you really think I use ALL the possibilities the Knife has on offer? 'Course not. btw, the saw I use now is a coiled string with a handle on each end and was about €6...
Anne Ominous
Nah. The spade/pick is a good idea, as the hard part of digging, at least shallowly, is loosening the dirt/rock. It can be lifted out by other means. So it's a pretty good idea as a substitute for a heavier shovel. But the "hatchet" is a joke. The angle between the edge of the blade and the width of the head makes it unusable for many -- perhaps even the majority -- of the tasks one would normally use a hatchet for. You couldn't even properly sharpen a stick. The angle is too steep. No thanks.
Steven Aclim8
Aplogies for being so late in responding. W*post. We wanted an option for people who are already happy with their survival knife. Most outdoorsmen will have a go-to knife already so that was part of the consideration. Anne Ominous, we used a design based on the Hudson Bay axe blade. To make the decision on the right size; shape and weight of our axe we looked at what most people would be doing outdoors. Our research showed that 90% of the time outdoorsmen would be using their axes for trail work including trimming branches and felling saplings up to 15-20cm (up to 7.87 inches) in diameter. That is what the axe blade is optimized for.
Nik
In my experience, ''multi-tools'' dont perform any of their functions as well as a tool specifically made for the job, so I avoid them.