Computers

The new Samsung Galaxy Chromebook is now the Chrome OS laptop to beat

The new Samsung Galaxy Chromeb...
Google hasn't produced a Pixelbook 2, but the Samsung Galaxy Chromebook fills the gap
Google hasn't produced a Pixelbook 2, but the Samsung Galaxy Chromebook fills the gap
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Google hasn't produced a Pixelbook 2, but the Samsung Galaxy Chromebook fills the gap
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Google hasn't produced a Pixelbook 2, but the Samsung Galaxy Chromebook fills the gap
The 13.3-inch 4K UHD AMOLED display on the Galaxy Chromebook rotates 360 degrees
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The 13.3-inch 4K UHD AMOLED display on the Galaxy Chromebook rotates 360 degrees
The Galaxy Chromebook features some high-end components under the hood
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The Galaxy Chromebook features some high-end components under the hood
You can unlock the Galaxy Chromebook w
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You can unlock the Galaxy Chromebook with a fingerprint
The stylus that comes with the Galaxy Chromebook fits inside the aluminum casing
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The stylus that comes with the Galaxy Chromebook fits inside the aluminum casing

Since it made its debut at the end of 2017, the Google Pixelbook has generally been considered the high-end Chromebook to beat – but that might have just changed with the launch of the Samsung Galaxy Chromebook at CES 2020.

Chromebooks don't necessarily need high-powered components – they essentially just run the Chrome browser and a few Android apps on the side – but the Galaxy Chromebook goes all-in on top-end specs.

For a start there's a 13.3-inch 4K UHD touchscreen display, using Samsung's superb-looking AMOLED screen technology and running at a resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 pixels (that's an aspect ratio of 16:9). HDR support is going to be arriving in a future software update, Samsung says.

The 13.3-inch 4K UHD AMOLED display on the Galaxy Chromebook rotates 360 degrees
The 13.3-inch 4K UHD AMOLED display on the Galaxy Chromebook rotates 360 degrees

Under the hood you've got a choice of 10th-gen Intel Core processors, up to 16 GB of RAM, and up to 1 TB of SSD storage – a specs list that is more than respectable for a normal Windows laptop, let alone one running Chrome OS.

The Galaxy Chromebook looks the part too, with neat and clear edges, thin display bezels, and an overall thickness of 9.9 mm (0.39 in) when closed. As with many Chromebooks on the market, the display can be flipped over to work as a makeshift tablet, and a stylus comes included with the laptop (and slots inside the aluminum casing when not in use).

Samsung is promising tight integration with Galaxy phones for sending messages and making calls with the Chromebook, and the laptop has all the usual Chrome OS features – automatic updating and built-in security, instant backups, and so on. Samsung says the battery will last for around eight hours between charges.

You can unlock the Galaxy Chromebook w
You can unlock the Galaxy Chromebook with a fingerprint

Judging by the photos Samsung has put out, and by the reaction of those who've used the Chromebook at the CES 2020 show, this is a premium Chromebook Samsung can be proud of. Chrome OS is a lightweight operating system, but that extra power helps in loading up apps faster, working with larger files, and generally racing through everyday tasks.

The Samsung Galaxy Chromebook is available in Mercury Gray as well as the Fiesta Red shown in the pictures here. Prices start at US$999.99 for 8 GB of RAM, 128 GB of storage and an Intel i5 Core processor when the laptop goes on sale in the first quarter of 2020 – that's on the expensive side, but if you're sure Chrome OS is for you, this is already one of the best Chromebooks of 2020.

Source: Samsung

1 comment
lucius
I have owned a Chromebook for years, and I appreciate its many positive qualities, but I have never understood why the Chrome Operating System can often be so incapable compared to Windows and Mac. The idea for siting the Chrome OS in the "cloud" is a good innovation, but it's as if Google just stopped caring about improving Chrome. There is no reason why it should be less powerful and flexible than other operating systems, but unfortunately, it is inadequate for many tasks that people need and want their computers to perform. The new Samsung Chromebook looks great, but I have to say that before I'd invest $1,000 in this laptop I'd want the Chrome OS to be much better than it currently is.