Bicycles

Double O bike lights are designed not to dazzle – or get stolen

Double O bike lights are desig...
The non-blinding Double O headlight
The non-blinding Double O headlight
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The non-blinding Double O headlight
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The non-blinding Double O headlight
The Double O tail light
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The Double O tail light
The two lights can be stuck together and threaded on the shackle of a U-lock
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The two lights can be stuck together and threaded on the shackle of a U-lock
Double O lights can also be attached to a helmet ...
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Double O lights can also be attached to a helmet ...
... or a backpack
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... or a backpack
The headlight puts out 85 lumens, with the tail light throwing out 50
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The headlight puts out 85 lumens, with the tail light throwing out 50
Depending on the settings used (flashing, steady, etc.) one set of batteries should reportedly be good for up to 50 hours of use
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Depending on the settings used (flashing, steady, etc.) one set of batteries should reportedly be good for up to 50 hours of use

As bicycle headlights continue to get brighter, a certain problem is starting to occur – they can actually be too bright, blinding oncoming drivers and cyclists. Lessening their output isn't a particularly appealing solution, so British designer Paul Cocksedge came up with an alternative. His Double O lights distribute the individual LEDs out around a ring, instead of concentrating them in a searing cluster. The lights also offer a few other handy features.

The result of a successful Kickstarter campaign, the Double O product line includes both a head- and tail light. Both of them are water-resistant, and can be attached to various parts of the bike (or the rider's helmet, or backpack) via an integrated heavy-duty elastic O-ring strap.

The headlight puts out 85 lumens, with the tail light throwing out 50. Each light is powered by three AA batteries. Depending on the settings used (flashing, steady, etc.) one set of batteries should reportedly be good for up to 50 hours of use.

Depending on the settings used (flashing, steady, etc.) one set of batteries should reportedly be good for up to 50 hours of use
Depending on the settings used (flashing, steady, etc.) one set of batteries should reportedly be good for up to 50 hours of use

While some bike lights are designed to thwart thieves by remaining permanently attached to the bike, the Double O design takes a different approach – the two lights can be taken off the bike and joined together back-to-back via integrated magnets, then threaded onto the shackle of a U-lock like beads on a bracelet. Riders not using that type of lock could, of course, just take the lights inside with them.

The Double O lights are available now for preorder, priced at £25 (about US$40) for one of either light, or £45 ($73) for a set of both. Shipping is expected to begin in November.

Source: Double O

5 comments
Freyr Gunnar
> The headlight puts out 85 lumens, with the tail light throwing out 50. Each light is powered by three AA batteries Ditch the batteries and include an on-board rechargeable battery with a USB port.
P17
There's a much simpler solution which the older of us remember.....point the lights down towards the road!!! Bloody cyclists are like smokers, they only consider themselves, and cause damage to everyone else!
Mel Tisdale
Surely all bikes should have permanently switched on, unadjustable lighting built in to the frame and powered by what used to be called a dyno-hub in one of the wheels so that a moving bike always has its lights on. It goes without saying that the paintwork should be reflective and also a pretty colour for those who like that kind of thing.
wle
85 lumens? very dim could go about as fast as walking with that dim light it wouldn;t blind anyone even if it was ''in one searing cluster''. geez you can get 1000 lumen lights from amazon, for $25USD i have one i point it down the road not at cars it is still dimmer than car lights wle
Dan Brown
I can't remember the last time I was blinded by a bicycle's lights, as a pedestrian, driver, or cyclist. High Intensity car headlights (not just aftermarket mods any longer) which blind you from up to four blocks away are a much bigger issue.