Drones

Long-range anti-drone gun can secure the entire neighborhood

Long-range anti-drone gun can ...
The Dronegun is shaped like an extravagant laser-tag rifle
The Dronegun is shaped like an extravagant laser-tag rifle
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The DroneGun has the ability to ground unmanned aircraft from up to 1.3 mi (2 km) away
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The DroneGun has the ability to ground unmanned aircraft from up to 1.3 mi (2 km) away
The Dronegun is shaped like an extravagant laser-tag rifle
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The Dronegun is shaped like an extravagant laser-tag rifle
The Dronegun blasts the drone with electromagnetic noise at the same frequencies it uses for video transmission and control communications
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The Dronegun blasts the drone with electromagnetic noise at the same frequencies it uses for video transmission and control communications
The company is not offering the DroneGun in the US, other than to government agencies
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The company is not offering the DroneGun in the US, other than to government agencies

Whether you're concerned about them snooping or indulging in something much more sinister like firing weapons, there are now a few precautions you can take when it comes to errant drones. If you don't have access to a flock of drone-hunting eagles, a new weapon could be the next-best option, with the ability to ground unmanned aircraft from up to 1.3 mi (2 km) away.

The Dronegun takes the same approach as a number of drone-jamming systems that fire radio waves into the distance to confuse the aircraft's control channels, such as the shoulder-mounted Battelle DroneDefender and the larger Anti-UAV Defence System.

The latter is capable of picking out drones as far away at 8 km (5 mi), but is a serious set of equipment that comes mounted on a vehicle. The Dronegun from Virginia-based Droneshield promises a more portable option that can quickly be whipped out in the case of an incoming threat.

The Dronegun blasts the drone with electromagnetic noise at the same frequencies it uses for video transmission and control communications
The Dronegun blasts the drone with electromagnetic noise at the same frequencies it uses for video transmission and control communications

Shaped like an extravagant laser-tag rifle, the Dronegun hooks up to a backpack and when adequately aimed, blasts the drone with electromagnetic noise at the same frequencies it uses for video transmission and control communications. This will typically cause the drone to return to its take-off point, though the Dronegun can block GPS too, in which case the drone will likely land on the spot.

The similarly designed Battelle DroneDefender can disable drones up to 400 m (1,300 ft) away, so the Dronegun promises a decidedly larger drone-free radius. It is not, however, intended for civilian use, at least not to begin with. The company is not offering it in the US, other than to government agencies, in the hope that they deem it a safe and appropriate anti-drone tool.

You can check out the Dronegun in action, in the promo video below.

Source: Dronegun

DroneShield DroneGun

6 comments
christopher
Kinda funny how everyone thinks drones are a danger to airplanes (they are not; birds are 2x to 10x heavier than drones, and planes are built to survive striking those), and the answer is a gun that can be pointed at an airplane and create an *actual* danger.
MD
Agree with first comment.. m question was "can this also be used to disable radio comms. on an airliner" that should have a fun outcome (not) Any fool can disable most drones (just as any fool can make a cannon), just stick a microwave magnetron inside a wave guide, aim, hit the on switch, drone should be done in 30 seconds (or so for a low power microwave... lol, no don't do that.. but you could (airliners too I suppose).
Chizzy
The reason that its not being offered to the public is because blocking gps signals is highly illegal. this thing is a modern anti technology weapon. anything with high tech such as self driving cars, airplanes, computers, robots etc is in danger from what is basically a tuned HERF gun.
chann94501
Given that the FAA regards drones as aircraft, do you really think it's a good idea to shoot them down? Eventually the laws will all solidify and at that point they will start prosecuting the federal crime of interfering with the operation of an aircraft, or something else. You can get thrown in prison for years for pointing a laser at aircraft, what do you think you'd get for shooting one down? Then there's the FCC side of this, are these devices licensed? Generally the FCC isn't very understanding about people operating any form of jamming. Jamming GPS risks commercial traffic too, you risk killing people landing at nearby airports, many approaches are GPS based now. Look up jamfaq.pdf on the FCC website, fines are from $16,000 per violation per day and up to $112,500 per incident. I know it's great fun to make things for shooting down drones electronically, but it isn't even close to legal unless you are law enforcement and they are doing something wrong.
Douglas E Knapp
Any normal person could get shot down by this device but I think anyone that is really into using a drone for evil will shift frequencies and perhaps harden the drone to outside attacks. Anyone with a ham license should be able to overcome this attack. Seems like a fun toy without much use.
ChristopherRees
I'm pleased to bring it to everyone's attention that in Canada and the United States, using these devices is a federal offence because it constitutes a cyber crime. Not only is it unlawfully taking control of another persons property, but it is also causing the potential of intentional harm of their property. If you are the victim of such an attack, feel free to call the police and file a report. ;)